Course descriptions from previous semesters are available at the bottom of this page.

All courses are offered for 3 credit hours unless otherwise noted. 

Course Number Course Name  Days/Times  Faculty
POSC 109 The U.S. Political System MWF
11:40-12:30
Justin Buchler
POSC 160 Introduction to Comparative Politics (Counts for CAS Global and Cultural Diversity Requirement) MW
12:45-2:00
Pete Moore
POSC 172 Introduction to International Relations TR
2:30-3:45
Kathryn Lavelle
POSC 322/422 Political Movements and Political Participation TR
1:00-2:15
Karen Beckwith
POSC 323/423 Judicial Politics TR
5:30-6:45
Michael Wager
POSC 327/427 Civil Liberties in America TR
11:30-12:45
Laura Tartakoff
POSC 349/449 Political Science Research Methods MWF
2:15-3:05
Justin Buchler
POSC 351/451 Modern Political Thought MW
3:20-4:35
Matthew Hodgetts
POSC 367/467 Western European Political Systems MWF
2:15-3:05
Girma Paris
POSC 370H/470H China’s Foreign Policy TR
10:00-11:15
Paul Schroeder
POSC 370M/470M Theories of Political Economy TR
11:30-12:45
Kathryn Lavelle
POSC 374/474 Politics of Development in the Global South TR
2:30-3:45
Paul Schroeder
POSC 383/483 Health Policy and Politics in the United States MWF
9:30-10:20
Joseph White
POSC 385/485 Doing Government Work: Public Administration in the U.S. MW
12:45-2:00
Joseph White
POSC 388/488 Politics, Policy, and the Global Environment MWF
11:40-12:30
Matthew Hodgetts
POSC 389/489 Special Topics in American Politics and Policy: Race, Immigration, and American Political Development MWF
10:35-11:25
Girma Paris
POSC 391/491 Pathologies of Democracy: Argentina, Paraguay, Ecuador, and the USA TR
4:00-5:15
Laura Tartakoff
POSC 395 Special Projects (1-6 credit hours. Prerequisites: see description) Times as arranged Staff
POSC 396  Senior Project/SAGES Capstone (Prerequisites: See description)  Times as arranged  Staff
POSC 495  Independent Study  (Graduate students only. Must be taken for a letter grade. Prerequisites: See description)  Times as arranged  Staff
POSC 601  Individual Investigation  (1-6 credit hours. Graduate students only. May be taken only on a pass/fail basis. Prerequisites: See description)  Times as arranged  Staff
POSC 651  M.A. Thesis Research  (6 credit hours. Graduate students only. Permission from supervisor and graduate committee is required. Grade is for the thesis itself, so Satisfactory or Unsatisfactory)  Times as arranged  Staff
POSC 701  Dissertation Ph.D.  (1-9 credit hours. Prerequisites: see description)  Times as arranged  Staff
Integrated Graduate Studies (See description)

POSC 109
The U.S. Political System                                                                                      

Justin Buchler
MWF 11:40-12:30

This course provides an overview of governmental institutions and processes in the United States, the political forces that combine to shape them, and how we might best understand the system that government and politics create.

POSC 160
Introduction to Comparative Politics                                                                      

Pete More
MW 12:45-2:00

Comparative politics is the study of processes and institutions within countries.  Prompted by real-world puzzles, comparativists investigate broad, theoretical questions:  What constitutes a revolution, and why do revolutions occur?  How does one country become more democratic than another?  Why do relations between some ethnic groups turn violent?  This course introduces some of the central puzzles and theories of comparative politics in order to help students better understand world events. Counts as CAS Global and Cultural Diversity Requirement.

POSC 172
Introduction to International Relations
Kathryn Lavelle
TR 2:30-3:45                     

Why do countries fight wars?  Can nuclear proliferation be curtailed?  Does trade help developing countries or harm them?  This survey of the field of International Relations examines “big questions” in world politics.  It introduces themes including the rise, development and changes of the nation-state system; patterns and causes of international conflict and cooperation; international law, organizations, and transnational institutions; the roles of both state and non-state actors in international politics; and the methods used to understand this field.

POSC 322/422
Political Movements and Political Participation
Karen Beckwith
TR 1:00-2:15

Political Movements and Political Participation is concerned with the variety of ways citizens engage in collective activism in the United States and across national boundaries, and with the conditions under which citizens identify common concerns and join together in political movements to bring about change.  The course begins with an examination of three general bodies of theory and research on political movements: resource mobilization, political opportunity structures, and cultural framing.  We will also investigate frameworks of political participation for understanding the relationships among different expressions of collective activism and representation.  In the context of these sometimes competing theories, we will consider 1) the conditions under which political movements are likely to emerge, as well as the circumstances in which collective political action is precluded; 2) how citizens come to recognize collective grievances and shared political identities; 3) the strategies and tactics of organized movements, and their likelihood of political success; and 4) the relationship between political movements, political parties, and the state. 

POSC 323/423
Judicial Politics
Michael Wager
TR 5:30-6:45

Rejecting the view that judges mechanically apply the law, the study of judicial politics seeks to understand the behavior of judges as political actors with policy goals. Topics include judicial selection and socialization, judicial policy change, judicial strategy (especially the strategic interaction of judges on multi-judge panels), the interaction of courts in hierarchical judicial systems, the policy impact of judicial decisions, and the courts’ interactions with coordinate branches of government (the executive, Congress, state governments, state courts). Primary focus will be on the federal judiciary, with some discussion of state judicial systems.

POSC 327/427
Civil Liberties in America
Laura Tartakoff
TR 11:30-12:45

Supreme Court’s interpretation of the First Amendment: liberty of religion through the establishment and free exercise clauses, freedoms of speech and the press, of assembly and association.  The “pure tolerance” view examined against subversive speech, “fighting words,” libel, and obscenity.  Survey of content-neutral regulation, symbolic expression, and current efforts to limit expression (campus speech codes and the feminist anti-pornography movement).

POSC 349/449
Political Science Research Methods
Justin Buchler
MWF 2:15-3:05

This course examines approaches that political scientists use to understand events and processes.  In doing so, the course provides students with skills helpful to completing senior projects, such as the ability to evaluate and conduct research.  Through exercises and projects, students will take part in the research process from constructing a question to developing a research design to interpreting results.  Students will learn and apply key techniques, including inductive and deductive reasoning, hypothesis construction, operationalization of concepts, measurements, sampling and probability, causal inference, and the logic of controls.  They will produce materials common to the discipline, such as research designs.

POSC 351/451
Modern Political Thought
Matthew Hodgetts
MW 3:20-4:35

The topic of this course is global justice and international political theory. It is organized around the question of what obligations, if any, do we have that extend beyond our borders. In a globalized world it is worth challenging assumptions we make about rights and justice. To do so, the class begins by looking historically to a tradition pessimistic about international morality, realism, followed by the response from liberals and their project for perpetual peace. Following, we will examine debates on international law, human rights, development, feminism, cosmopolitanism, migrants and refugees, and the environment. In each case, we will ask in what ways these discourses challenge how we think about global interconnectedness and how such relations should be organized. Classes will be discussion-driven and students will be responsible for producing a major piece of writing. The class assumes no prior experience with political philosophy or theory.

POSC 367/467
Western European Political Systems
Girma Paris
MWF 2:15-3:05

Comparative analysis of sociopolitical systems of selected Western European industrial democracies, using North American systems as a point of comparison.

POSC 370H/470H
China’s Foreign Policy
Paul Schroeder
TR 10:00-11:15

The rise of China is evident in the country’s more forward and robust foreign policy that began in 1979.  At every turn, nations throughout the world must now consider China wherever their interests are at stake, be it Korea and Northeast Asia, Indochina and Southeast Asia, India/Pakistan and South Asia, or Afghanistan and Iran in the Middle East, not to mention the many African states that welcome Chinese investment but chafe at China’s presence.  Further, China is increasingly aggressive in international trade, a major determinant of its foreign policy.  This course describes the key factors that make up Chinese foreign policy, including its cultural tradition, policy-making institutions, the role of the military, and domestic determinants of foreign policy.  The course also examines China’s ever-changing foreign policy strategies, from an aggressive posture to charming its neighbors only to become more strident once again.  The course will also examine China’s role involving possible mercantilism, currency manipulation, and the hunt for traditional and alternative energy sources.  Throughout the course, we will pay attention to how China’s foreign policy relates to international relations theories and what strategies might be used to manage China’s growing role in international affairs.

POSC 370M/470M
Theories of Political Economy
Kathryn Lavelle
TR 11:30-12:45

This course is a SAGES departmental seminar in political economy that brings a wide range of theoretical perspectives to bear on the relations between market and state in the contemporary world. It focuses on three questions: What have been the major debates concerning the role of the government in the economy?  How were these debates resolved in the compromise of embedded liberalism, and What experiences have individual states had with these questions of political economy? To answer these questions, we will read original literature to uncover the connections among politics, economics, and the world of ideas that has resulted in the political debates we confront today.

POSC 374/474
Politics of Development in the Global South
Paul Schroeder
TR 2:30-3:45

This course considers several global issues that impact economic and political development.  This course examines the nature of failed or fragile states; the Washington/Beijing development models;  poverty; public health; water; the quest for energy and natural resources; education; environmental degradation; the role of the military; international trade; and the development of the BRICS (Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa). Offered as ETHS 374.

POSC 383/483
Health Policy and Politics in the United States
Joseph White
MWF 9:30-10:20

Overview of the principal institutions, processes, social forces, and ideas shaping the U.S. health system.  Historical, political, economic, and sociological perspectives on the health system are explored as well as the intellectual context of recent policy changes, challenges, and developments.  Students will acquire a sense of how health services are financed and delivered in the U.S.  They will also learn how to assess its performance compared to that of other similar countries.

POSC 385/485
Doing Government Work: Public Administration in the U.S.
Joseph White
MW 12:45-2:00

This course focuses on how governments, particularly governments in the United States, do their work.  The topic is often called “public administration,” or “implementation,” or “bureaucratic politics.”  It involves what James Q. Wilson calls government “operators” such as teachers, public health doctors, agricultural extension agents, grant administrators and Seal teams.  Their actions depend on their own values; conflict among political authorities, and on what is needed to perform specific tasks.  We will begin by discussing the challenges of organizing to do anything, or organization theory; turn to the peculiar political context of administration in the United States; and apply these understandings to specific government activities.  Students should emerge with a better understanding of why government agencies do what they do, and why they succeed or fail.

POSC 388/488
Politics, Policy, and the Global Environment
Matthew Hodgetts
MWF 11:40-12:30

In 1992, the international community committed itself to the goal of preventing dangerous anthropogenic climate change and reaffirmed this in Paris in 2015. Yet in October 2018, the IPCC warned us that we are very rapidly running out of time to achieve these commitments and that doing so will require unprecedented effort. Why is it that more than a quarter century after committing to do something, we find ourselves receiving such warnings? The purpose of this course is to provide a set of answers to this question from the perspective of political science. Our focus will be on exploring the range of ways in which we attempt to collectively govern climate change, framed by the question of is there a pathway to successful climate governance? Starting with the international regime, we will go on to examine other means of collective governance, from transnational municipal networks, global activism, to corporate social responsibility, as well as our international efforts to deal with global issues surrounding geoengineering, climate conflict, and refugees. The workload for this course assumes advanced standing but no prior experience with political science. Offered as ESTD 388.

POSC 389/489
Special Topics in American Politics and Policy: Race, Immigration and American Political Development
Girma Paris
MWF 10:35-11:25

This course takes a historical look at the politics of race and immigration as a means of not only detailing its history but in brining into relief the historical lineage of contemporary issues in the politics of race and the politics of immigration. The course will look at the historical origins of (but not limited to) the following contemporary issues: undocumented immigration, nativism. refugee policy, police brutality, residential segregation, mass incarceration and socioeconomic gaps that correlate with race and ethnicity. A secondary goal of the course is to show how historically the politics of race and immigration have interacted and/ or reinforced policy developments in the other. This has led to political developments in race/ immigration often reinforcing or spurring political development in the other. In addressing this secondary goal, the course will investigate the institutional and political foundations of the socio economic hierarchies that have developed along race and ethnic lines. Written assignments, class discussion and class examinations will be oriented towards the investigatory aims of these two goals.

POSC 391/491
Pathologies of Democracy: Argentina, Paraguay, Ecuador, and the USA
Laura Tartakoff
TR 4:00-5:15

Democracy is fragile and should not be taken for granted. Though it does not change human nature, democracy generally allows nation-states to address challenges peacefully in a constitutional manner, curtailing leaders’ ambitions through checks and balances. Most nation-states in Latin America are now electoral multiparty representative presidential democracies. However, they have been (and still are), more than the USA, marked by serious disorders — among them, demagogic authoritarian leaders, political populism, weak political parties, nationalism, gerrymandering, both private and public corruption, and discontent. After touching on different types of democracy, this course will focus on such ailments in Argentina, Paraguay, Ecuador, and the USA to gain both a realistic perspective regarding them and to touch on possible remedies — trustworthy institutions, rule of law, human rights, governmental accountability, civic vigilance, intermediate  associations, and communal practices.

POSC 395
Special Projects

(Requires consent and a permit from instructor)  Study of a topic of particular interest, or an approved internship. The student must submit to the departmental office a project prospectus form, approved and signed by the faculty supervisor, no later than the end of the second week of classes. The prospectus must outline the goals of the project and the research methodology to be used and is part of the basis for grading. The prospectus form is available from the departmental office of from the department’s Web page.

POSC 396
Senior Project SAGES Capstone
Times as Arranged

(Requires consent and a permit from instructor)  Capstone experience for political science majors or senior POSC minors as part of the SAGES program, providing opportunity to do an in-depth paper on a topic of particular interest to them. Students must obtain approval from a faculty project advisor and list that advisor on the registration form. The advisor must sign and student submit to the department a prospectus including goals, schedule, and research methodology. This paper should demonstrate, and ideally even extend, the skills and expertise developed over the course of study in the department. Upon completion of the capstone, students will be expected to present their work in a public forum. Recommended preparation: Junior or Senior political science major or senior political science minor and departmental prospectus form. Counts as SAGES Senior Capstone.

POSC 495
Independent Study
Staff
Times as Arranged

(Requires consent and a permit from instructor)  Independent study on particular topics that are not covered by individual graduate courses or are not available in a timely manner for the student’s needs.  In order to receive a permit, the student must complete a prospectus form, approved and signed by the faculty project supervisor and the student.  The prospectus must outline the material to be covered and the basis for grading of the course, and a copy of the form will be filed with the Department Office.  POSC 495 is designed especially for reading courses but can be used for other purposes as well.  Note that this course will result in a letter grade.  Graduate students wanting to take independent study on a pass/fail basis should speak with their project supervisors about registering for POSC 601, “Individual Investigation.”

POSC 601
Individual Investigation
Staff
Times as Arranged

(Requires consent and a permit from instructor)  POSC 601 permits a graduate student to do an in-depth study of a topic of particular interest for which no regular course is available.  It should be particularly helpful in preparing for field exams.  Students must develop their course of study with a supervising professor, who will set requirements for written work.

Credit (1-6 hours) and times as arranged.  Note that this course may be taken only on a pass/fail basis.  Graduate students who wish to do a project for a letter grade should speak with their supervising professors about registering for POSC 495, “Independent Study.”

IMPORTANT:  In order to obtain a permit, the student must complete a POSC 601 project prospectus form, signed by the faculty project advisor and the student, which will form the basis of a “contract” of expectations for the project.  The prospectus form, available in the Department Office (Mather House 111), will outline the goals of the project and the research methodology to be used and thus will be part of the basis for grading.  A copy of this completed and signed form will be filed with the Department Office.

POSC 651
M.A. Thesis Research
Staff
Times as Arranged

Independent study of a research question and completion of a major paper under advisor supervision. The School of Graduate Study requires 6 credit hours be completed.  The thesis will be reviewed by the advisor and a departmental committee.

POSC 701
Dissertation Ph.D.
Staff
Times as Arranged

(Requires consent and a permit from instructor)  Credit (1-9 hours) and times as arranged.  However, Graduate School regulations specify that a student must register for a minimum of 3 hours of 701 per semester until 18 hours of 701 credit have been completed.  After having earned 18 hours of 701, a candidate may be permitted to register for less than 3 hours per semester, but only with the prior approval of his/her dissertation advisor and only for a maximum of four semesters.  Thereafter, the student must resume registering for a minimum of 3 hours of 701 credit per semester until the dissertation is completed and defended.  See the Political Science Graduate Brochure or your POSC dissertation advisor for complete details on eligibility to register for 701.

Integrated Graduate Studies (IGS)
Special Program

It is possible for a qualified student to obtain an M.A. in Political Science simultaneously with, or shortly after, completion of the baccalaureate program.  If by the end of the senior year the student has completed successfully 90 undergraduate hours, 30 graduate hours (for a total of 120 hours), and the Political Science M.A. Examination, that student can receive both the Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees within the four undergraduate years.

Admission to the Political Science IGS program is competitive, and only a limited number of students are accepted in any academic year.  Admission is determined by fulfillment of specific requirements (see below), and by the Department’s estimate of the student’s potential for advanced study and independent work.

Phase I of IGS alerts the Department and the School of Graduate Studies to your interest in the program and allows the monitoring of your junior year for fulfillment of the undergraduate prerequisites to graduate study.  Application to Phase I must occur no later than second week of classes at the beginning of the junior year, but preferably earlier.  To qualify for Phase I, the student must have completed 54 hours of undergraduate work and must have minimum grade point averages of 3.7 in Political Science courses and 3.3 overall.

During Phase I, the student must complete 90 undergraduate hours (ordinarily by the end of the junior year) and must have satisfied all general requirements for the B.A., including at least 21 hours in the Political Science major, the Arts and Sciences Core Curriculum, and one minor program.  Included in the 21 Political Science hours must be one course each in American, Comparative, and International politics taken at CWRU.  Also, the student must maintain minimum GPAs of 3.5 in Political Science courses and 3.3 overall to qualify for admission to Phase II.

Before enrolling for any graduate-level course work, the student must be formally admitted to the School of Graduate Studies (Phase II of IGS).  Therefore, it is mandatory that application to Phase II occur during the second semester of the junior year, specifically no later than April 1 or November 1 (for graduate status to begin the following semester).  If admitted to the M.A. program, the student will take, or begin to take, 30 hours of graduate-level Political Science courses during the senior year, adhering to all departmental regulations governing the Master’s degree program; and if completed successfully with maintenance of academic standing as pertains to both the B.A. and M.A. programs, these hours will count simultaneously toward both degrees in Political Science.  The B.A. will be awarded upon completion of all requirements for that degree, including total hours; the M.A. will be awarded upon successful completion of the 30 hours of graduate-level Political Science courses and the M.A. Examination or Thesis.

For additional information on application procedures and program requirements, make an appointment to see Professor Joseph White  (Mather House 113, 368-2426, e-mail: joseph.white@case.edu).

All courses are offered for 3 credit hours unless otherwise noted. 

Course Number Course Name  Days/Times  Faculty
POSC 109 The U.S. Political System  MWF 10:35-11:25 Girma Parris
POSC 160 Introduction to Comparative Politics (Counts for CAS Global and Cultural Diversity Requirement) MWF 9:30-10:20 Matthew Hodgetts
POSC 172 Introduction to International Relations MWF 3:20-4:10
MWF 11:40-12:30
Matthew Hodgetts
Paul Schroeder
POSC 308/408 The American Presidency TR 1:00-2:15 Joseph White
POSC 321/421 News Media and Politics MWF 2:15-3:05 Girma Parris
POSC 325/425 American Constitutional Law TR 11:30-12:45 Laura Tartakoff
POSC 341/441 Elections, Voters, and Political Parties MW 12:45-2:00 Karen Beckwith
POSC 354/454 Political and Social Philosophy TR 4:00-5:15 Laura Hengehold
POSC 364/464 Dictatorship and Democracy in Modern Latin America (Counts for CAS Global and Cultural Diversity Requirement) TR 5:30-6:45 Laura Tartakoff
POSC 370D/470D The Politics of China (Counts for CAS Global and Cultural Diversity Requirement) MWF 2:15-3:05 Paul Schroeder
POSC 370F/470F Financial Politics in the United States and the World TR 2:30-3:45 Kathryn Lavelle
POSC 370J/470J International Law and Organizations TR 11:30-12:45 Kathryn Lavelle
POSC 379/479 Introduction to Middle East Politics (Counts for CAS Global and Cultural Diversity Requirement) TR 10:00-11:15 Pete Moore
POSC 380A State and War in Africa and the Middle East (Counts as SAGES Departmental Seminar) TR 1:00-2:15 Pete Moore
POSC 382A Child Policy MW 5:30-6:45 Gabriella Celeste
POSC 395 Special Projects (1-6 credit hours. Prerequisites: see description) Times as arranged Staff
POSC 396 Senior Project/SAGES Capstone (Prerequisites: See description) Times as arranged Staff
POSC 495 Independent Study  (Graduate students only. Must be taken for a letter grade. Prerequisites: See description) Times as arranged Staff
POSC 601 Individual Investigation  (1-6 credit hours. Graduate students only. May be taken only on a pass/fail basis. Prerequisites: See description) Times as arranged Staff
POSC 651 M.A. Thesis Research  (6 credit hours. Graduate students only. Permission from supervisor and graduate committee is required. Grade is for the thesis itself, so Satisfactory or Unsatisfactory) Times as arranged Staff
POSC 701 Dissertation Ph.D.  (1-9 credit hours. Prerequisites: see description) Times as arranged Staff
Integrated Graduate Studies (See description)

POSC 109
The U.S. Political System                                                                                      

Girma Parris
MWF 10:35-11:25

This course provides an overview of governmental institutions and processes in the United States, the political forces that combine to shape them, and how we might best understand the system that government and politics create.

POSC 160
Introduction to Comparative Politics                                                                      

Matthew Hodgetts
MWF 9:30-10:20

Comparative politics is the study of processes and institutions within countries.  Prompted by real-world puzzles, comparativists investigate broad, theoretical questions:  What constitutes a revolution, and why do revolutions occur?  How does one country become more democratic than another?  Why do relations between some ethnic groups turn violent?  This course introduces some of the central puzzles and theories of comparative politics in order to help students better understand world events. Counts as CAS Global and Cultural Diversity Requirement.

POSC 172
Introduction to International Relations
Matthew Hodgetts
MWF 3:20-4:10
Paul Schroeder
MWF 11:40-12:30                                

Why do countries fight wars?  Can nuclear proliferation be curtailed?  Does trade help developing countries or harm them?  This survey of the field of International Relations examines “big questions” in world politics.  It introduces themes including the rise, development and changes of the nation-state system; patterns and causes of international conflict and cooperation; international law, organizations, and transnational institutions; the roles of both state and non-state actors in international politics; and the methods used to understand this field.

POSC 308/408
The American Presidency
Joseph White
TR 1:00-2:15

Introduction to the institutions and processes that make up the political environment of nonprofit and other organizations in the United States, beginning with an examination of the role of civil society in a democracy and continuing with the framing of issues, role of political entrepreneurs and organized interests, elections, the legislative process and strategies for influencing it, and the roles of executive institutions and the courts.

POSC 321/421
News Media and Politics
Girma Parris
MWF 2:15-3:05

This course traces the evolution of the media from an appendage of the American Party system to the so called fourth branch of government and how its influence on the political system has changed with its maturation. A central theme of the course will be an investigation of the changing normative conceptions concerning the role of the media in a popular democracy: When did fake news become objective journalism? Is the news now fake or objective? And why does this matter? These are some of the issues that students will address in class and in written assignment/ class examination.

POSC 325/425
American Constitutional Law
Laura Tartakoff
TR 11:30-12:45

An introductory survey of U.S. constitutional law.  Special attention given to the historical, philosophical, and political dimensions of landmark Supreme Court cases. Judicial review, federalism, separation of powers, due process, and equal protection.  Supreme Court’s involvement in major political controversies: the New Deal, abortion, physician-assisted suicide, school desegregation, and affirmative action.

POSC 341/441
Elections, Voter, and Political Parties
Karen Beckwith
MW 12:45-2:00

Rights of the accused as outlined in the Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, and Eighth Amendments.  Topics covered are (1) arrests, searches, and seizures, (2) the privilege against compelled self-incrimination, (3) the rights to counsel, confrontation, and jury trial, and (4) the prohibition against cruel and unusual punishments.  Case-specific approach but presents interplay of history, philosophy, and politics as background of each topic.

 

POSC 354/454
Political and Social Philosophy
Laura Hengehold
TR 4:00-5:15

Justification of social institutions, primarily political ones. Such distinctions as that between de facto and legitimate authority; analysis of criteria for evaluation, such as social justice and equality; inquiry into theories of justification of the state; theory of democratic government and its alternatives. Readings from classical and contemporary sources. Recommended preparation: PHIL 101.

POSC 364/464
Dictatorship and Democracy in Modern Latin America
Laura Tartakoff
TR 5:30-6:45

Examination of political leadership in 20th-century Latin America, exploring the nature, causes, and consequences of dictatorship and democracy in the region, moving from the collapse of oligarchic rule and the emergence of populism in the 1930s and 1940s, to the end of democracy and establishment of military regimes in the 1960s and 1970s, and ultimately to the contemporary processes of democratization and economic liberalization.

POSC 370D/470D
The Politics of China
Paul Schroeder
MWF 2:15-3:05

Now more than ever, the Chinese state and society are facing tremendous economic, social, and political challenges.  This course presents an overview of current issues facing the People’s Republic, including a changing (or not) political culture, policy processes and outcomes at the national and local levels, reform and economic growth, the resultant societal changes and pressures, and the consequent challenges the Communist Party faces as demand for political reform grows.  The class involves a mixture of lectures and discussion and draws on a combination of primary and secondary sources, including current news reports and films. Counts as CAS Global and Cultural Diversity Requirement.

POSC 370F/470F
Financial Politics in the United States and the World
Kathryn Lavelle
TR 2:30-3:45

This course explores how political institutions make policy in the financial area with particular emphasis on the United States.  Using a bureaucratic politics framework, it examines money, banks and the securities industry by integrating a wide range of literature in economics and political science.  Specific objectives include familiarizing students with different approaches to the political economy of finance from different disciplines, exploring the historical evolution of finance, examining the changing relationship between public and private authority within the financial system, considering how politics operates in a crisis, and evaluating the role of international financial institutions in the global economy.  By taking this course, students will equip themselves for further research into politics and economics, as well as offer them tools to analyze future policy developments as they unfold.

POSC 370J/470J
International Law and Organizations
Kathryn Lavelle
TR 11:30-12:45

Study of international organizations and international law as two means for regulating and coordinating nation-state behavior. History of the two techniques will be traced, covering 19th century efforts at cooperation, the League of Nations and the United Nations, regional and specialized global organization. The functions of international law in global politics will be stressed, with primary focus on the evolving role of law in dealing with global problems, e.g., war, the environment, economic cooperation, and human rights.

POSC 379/479
Introduction to Middle East Politics
Pete Moore
TR 10:00-11:15

This is an introductory course about Middle East Politics, in regional as well as international aspects.  In this course we will explore broad social, economic, and political themes that have defined the region since the end of World War Two.  Since this is an introductory course, a major goal will be to gain comparative knowledge about the region’s states and peoples.  The countries that comprise the modern Middle East are quite diverse; therefore, we will only be able to focus on a few cases in depth.  A second goal is to use the tools and theories social scientists employ to answer broad questions related to the region, such as: How have colonial legacies shaped political and economic development in the Middle East?  How do oil, religion, and identity interact with politics?  How have external powers affected the region’s political development?  What do the uprisings of 2011 hold for the region’s future? Counts as CAS Global and Cultural Diversity Requirement.

POSC 380A
State and War in Africa and the Middle East
Pete Moore
TR 1:00-2:15

The Middle East, North Africa, and Sub-Saharan Africa remain the most volatile and conflict prone regions of the world.  Traditional approaches to war and state conflict have emphasized systemic variables, such as balance of power, military capabilities, perceptions, the security dilemma, and of course anarchy.  While these concepts have generated much academic interest, their ability to explain and understand conflict in the developing world is severely limited.  This is due to the basic fact that nearly all conflict in the world today is not between states but is taking place within state boundaries.  What drives these conflicts?  Are there common factors and patterns within the Middle East and Africa?  How does sub-state conflict affect political and economic development?  What are the most likely resolution strategies?  Recommended preparation: POSC 379. Counts as SAGES Departmental Seminar.

POSC 382A
Child Policy
Gabriella Celeste
MW 5:30-6:45

This course introduces students to issues in public policy that impact children and families. Local, state, and federal child policy will be considered, and topics will include, for example, policies related to child poverty, education, child welfare, juvenile justice, and children’s physical and mental health. Students will learn how policy is developed, how research informs policy and vice versa, and a framework for analyzing social policy. Recommended preparation: One social sciences course or consent.
Also offered as ANTH 305 and CHST 301.

POSC 395
Special Projects

(Requires consent and a permit from instructor)  Study of a topic of particular interest, or an approved internship. The student must submit to the departmental office a project prospectus form, approved and signed by the faculty supervisor, no later than the end of the second week of classes. The prospectus must outline the goals of the project and the research methodology to be used and is part of the basis for grading. The prospectus form is available from the departmental office of from the department’s Web page.

POSC 396
Senior Project SAGES Capstone
Times as Arranged

(Requires consent and a permit from instructor)  Capstone experience for political science majors or senior POSC minors as part of the SAGES program, providing opportunity to do an in-depth paper on a topic of particular interest to them. Students must obtain approval from a faculty project advisor and list that advisor on the registration form. The advisor must sign and student submit to the department a prospectus including goals, schedule, and research methodology. This paper should demonstrate, and ideally even extend, the skills and expertise developed over the course of study in the department. Upon completion of the capstone, students will be expected to present their work in a public forum. Recommended preparation: Junior or Senior political science major or senior political science minor and departmental prospectus form. Counts as SAGES Senior Capstone.

POSC 495
Independent Study
Staff
Times as Arranged

(Requires consent and a permit from instructor)  Independent study on particular topics that are not covered by individual graduate courses or are not available in a timely manner for the student’s needs.  In order to receive a permit, the student must complete a prospectus form, approved and signed by the faculty project supervisor and the student.  The prospectus must outline the material to be covered and the basis for grading of the course, and a copy of the form will be filed with the Department Office.  POSC 495 is designed especially for reading courses but can be used for other purposes as well.  Note that this course will result in a letter grade.  Graduate students wanting to take independent study on a pass/fail basis should speak with their project supervisors about registering for POSC 601, “Individual Investigation.”

POSC 601
Individual Investigation
Staff
Times as Arranged

(Requires consent and a permit from instructor)  POSC 601 permits a graduate student to do an in-depth study of a topic of particular interest for which no regular course is available.  It should be particularly helpful in preparing for field exams.  Students must develop their course of study with a supervising professor, who will set requirements for written work.

Credit (1-6 hours) and times as arranged.  Note that this course may be taken only on a pass/fail basis.  Graduate students who wish to do a project for a letter grade should speak with their supervising professors about registering for POSC 495, “Independent Study.”

IMPORTANT:  In order to obtain a permit, the student must complete a POSC 601 project prospectus form, signed by the faculty project advisor and the student, which will form the basis of a “contract” of expectations for the project.  The prospectus form, available in the Department Office (Mather House 111), will outline the goals of the project and the research methodology to be used and thus will be part of the basis for grading.  A copy of this completed and signed form will be filed with the Department Office.

POSC 651
M.A. Thesis Research
Staff
Times as Arranged

Independent study of a research question and completion of a major paper under advisor supervision. The School of Graduate Study requires 6 credit hours be completed.  The thesis will be reviewed by the advisor and a departmental committee.

POSC 701
Dissertation Ph.D.
Staff
Times as Arranged

(Requires consent and a permit from instructor)  Credit (1-9 hours) and times as arranged.  However, Graduate School regulations specify that a student must register for a minimum of 3 hours of 701 per semester until 18 hours of 701 credit have been completed.  After having earned 18 hours of 701, a candidate may be permitted to register for less than 3 hours per semester, but only with the prior approval of his/her dissertation advisor and only for a maximum of four semesters.  Thereafter, the student must resume registering for a minimum of 3 hours of 701 credit per semester until the dissertation is completed and defended.  See the Political Science Graduate Brochure or your POSC dissertation advisor for complete details on eligibility to register for 701.

Integrated Graduate Studies (IGS)
Special Program

It is possible for a qualified student to obtain an M.A. in Political Science simultaneously with, or shortly after, completion of the baccalaureate program.  If by the end of the senior year the student has completed successfully 90 undergraduate hours, 30 graduate hours (for a total of 120 hours), and the Political Science M.A. Examination, that student can receive both the Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees within the four undergraduate years.

Admission to the Political Science IGS program is competitive, and only a limited number of students are accepted in any academic year.  Admission is determined by fulfillment of specific requirements (see below), and by the Department’s estimate of the student’s potential for advanced study and independent work.

Phase I of IGS alerts the Department and the School of Graduate Studies to your interest in the program and allows the monitoring of your junior year for fulfillment of the undergraduate prerequisites to graduate study.  Application to Phase I must occur no later than second week of classes at the beginning of the junior year, but preferably earlier.  To qualify for Phase I, the student must have completed 54 hours of undergraduate work and must have minimum grade point averages of 3.7 in Political Science courses and 3.3 overall.

During Phase I, the student must complete 90 undergraduate hours (ordinarily by the end of the junior year) and must have satisfied all general requirements for the B.A., including at least 21 hours in the Political Science major, the Arts and Sciences Core Curriculum, and one minor program.  Included in the 21 Political Science hours must be one course each in American, Comparative, and International politics taken at CWRU.  Also, the student must maintain minimum GPAs of 3.5 in Political Science courses and 3.3 overall to qualify for admission to Phase II.

Before enrolling for any graduate-level course work, the student must be formally admitted to the School of Graduate Studies (Phase II of IGS).  Therefore, it is mandatory that application to Phase II occur during the second semester of the junior year, specifically no later than April 1 or November 1 (for graduate status to begin the following semester).  If admitted to the M.A. program, the student will take, or begin to take, 30 hours of graduate-level Political Science courses during the senior year, adhering to all departmental regulations governing the Master’s degree program; and if completed successfully with maintenance of academic standing as pertains to both the B.A. and M.A. programs, these hours will count simultaneously toward both degrees in Political Science.  The B.A. will be awarded upon completion of all requirements for that degree, including total hours; the M.A. will be awarded upon successful completion of the 30 hours of graduate-level Political Science courses and the M.A. Examination or Thesis.

For additional information on application procedures and program requirements, make an appointment to see Professor Pete Moore  (Mather House 219, 368-5265, e-mail: pete.moore@case.edu).

All courses are offered for 3 credit hours unless otherwise noted. 

Course Number Course Name  Days/Times  Faculty
POSC 109 The U.S. Political System  MWF 2:15-3:05 Girma Parris
POSC 160 Introduction to Comparative Politics (Counts for CAS Global and Cultural Diversity Requirement) TR 10:00-11:15 Yu Jung (Julia) Lee
POSC 172 Introduction to International Relations TR 11:30-12:45

Kathryn Lavelle

 

POSC 310/410 Congress in an Era of Polarization MWF 2:15-3:05 Justin Buchler
POSC 319/419 Politics and Money MWF 11:40–12:20 Justin Buchler
POSC 348/448 History of Modern Political and Social Thought M 3:20-5:50 Miriam Levin
POSC 353/453 Political Thought and Political Change in China MWF 11:40-12:30 Paul Schroeder
POSC 360/460 Revolts and Revolutions in Global Perspective (Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement) MW 3:20-4:35 Pete Moore
POSC 363/463 Comparative Analysis of Elections and Electoral Systems (Counts as SAGES Departmental Seminar) MW 12:45-2:00 Karen Beckwith
POSC 370A/470A Political Economy TR 10:00-11:15 Elliot Posner
POSC 370C/470C The United States and Asia MWF 10:35-11:25 Paul Schroeder
POSC 371/471 Natural Resources and World Politics MW 12:45-2:00 Pete Moore
POSC 373/473 Politics of the European Union TR 2:30-3:45 Elliot Posner
POSC 374/474 Politics of Development in the Global South TR 1:00-2:15 Yu Jung (Julia) Lee
POSC 377/477 Politics of Russia (Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement) TR 11:30-12:45 Kelly McMann
POSC 378/478 International Relations Theory (Counts as SAGES Departmental Seminar) TR 2:30-3:45 Kathryn Lavelle
POSC 395 Special Projects (1-6 credit hours. Prerequisites: see description) Times as arranged Staff
POSC 396 Senior Project/SAGES Capstone (Prerequisites: See description) Times as arranged Staff
POSC 495 Independent Study  (Graduate students only. Must be taken for a letter grade. Prerequisites: See description) Times as arranged Staff
POSC 601 Individual Investigation  (1-6 credit hours. Graduate students only. May be taken only on a pass/fail basis. Prerequisites: See description) Times as arranged Staff
POSC 651 M.A. Thesis Research  (6 credit hours. Graduate students only. Permission from supervisor and graduate committee is required. Grade is for the thesis itself, so Satisfactory or Unsatisfactory) Times as arranged Staff
POSC 701 Dissertation Ph.D.  (1-9 credit hours. Prerequisites: see description) Times as arranged Staff
Integrated Graduate Studies (See description)

POSC 109
The U.S. Political System                                                                                      

Girma Parris
MWF 2:15-3:05

This course provides an overview of governmental institutions and processes in the United States, the political forces that combine to shape them, and how we might best understand the system that government and politics create.

POSC 160
Introduction to Comparative Politics                                                                      

Yu Jung (Julia) Lee
TR 10:00-11:15

Comparative politics is the study of processes and institutions within countries.  Prompted by real-world puzzles, comparativists investigate broad, theoretical questions:  What constitutes a revolution, and why do revolutions occur?  How does one country become more democratic than another?  Why do relations between some ethnic groups turn violent?  This course introduces some of the central puzzles and theories of comparative politics in order to help students better understand world events. Counts as CAS Global and Cultural Diversity Requirement.

POSC 172
Introduction to International Relations
Kathryn Lavelle
TR 11:30-12:45                               

Why do countries fight wars?  Can nuclear proliferation be curtailed?  Does trade help developing countries or harm them?  This survey of the field of International Relations examines “big questions” in world politics.  It introduces themes including the rise, development and changes of the nation-state system; patterns and causes of international conflict and cooperation; international law, organizations, and transnational institutions; the roles of both state and non-state actors in international politics; and the methods used to understand this field.

POSC 310/410
Congress in an Era of Polarization
Justin Buchler
MWF 2:15-3:05

A study of Congress in the modern era with emphasis on the development of polarization, procedural changes, conflict between the legislative and executive branches during divided government, and the current state of representation.

POSC 319
Politics and Money
Justin Buchler
MWF 11:40-12:20

An experimental version of POSC319, built around the use of modern science fiction literature to explore topics in money, politics and power.  Readings will consist of novels by authors including John Scalzi, Neal Stephenson, Charles Stross and others, which address critical concepts about money, politics and power.  Readings will be accompanied by lectures on the underlying social scientific concepts, seminar-based discussion of how these concepts work within the novels and how they relate to modern politics, and student presentations in which students discuss articles from political science journals on topics related to those concepts.

POSC 348/448
History of Modern Political and Social Thought
Miriam Levin
M 3:20-5:50

This course explores the responses of philosophers, economic theorists, culture critics, public policy makers and urban planners to changes in western society wrought by industrialization by focusing on their concerns with governance, social reform and control, production and consumption, alienation, the deteriorating environment, and the possibility of progress itself. Cross-listed as HSTY 348, HSTY 448.

POSC 353/453
Political Thought and Political Change in China
Paul Schroeder
MWF 11:40-12:30

“No state is forever strong or forever weak,” said Han Feizi, China’s great legalist philosopher. He believed that as a country’s conditions changed, the laws and institutions had to change to meet these new circumstances. China today faces new circumstances that have caused deep and broad challenges to its people. This has prompted serious debate among intellectuals, leaders, and average citizens about the possibility for and direction of political reform. But what might that reform look like, and how would it be conceived, if it could overcome the current barriers? This seminar will provide a fuller understanding of China’s potential for political change by examining Chinese political thought from Confucius, Mencius and Han Feizi through Mao Zedong and Deng Xiaoping. These and other political philosophies have influenced China’s political culture, which will influence the form of any change.

POSC 360/460
Revolts and Revolutions in Global Perspective
Pete Moore
MW 3:20-4:35

The Arab protests of 2011 gripped the attention of the world. Young protestors succeeded in unseating some long time rulers but in other cases tense standoffs have evolved. This course takes those events as a starting point to examine the broader political history of revolts and revolutions in the global south. The first part of the course examines some of the classic social science debates about what constitutes revolution, what leads to revolution, and what the effects can be. The second part of the course analyzes specific cases in Europe, Latin America, Africa, and Asia to understand the causes and consequences of revolt and revolution. What drives everyday persons to brave the dangers of protest? When and why do political leaders decide to resist or reform? What happens when revolts fail? What happens when they succeed? Material for the course will include classic social science narratives, revolutionary polemics, popular analyses of events since 2011, examples of social media as political action, and first person narratives. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement.

POSC 363/463
Comparative Analysis of Elections and Electoral Systems
Karen Beckwith
MW 12:45-2:00

Elections involve more than a simple act of voting to express individual preferences. The rules under which worldwide elections are held determine who controls the executive and how votes are converted into legislative seats. The mechanics of various electoral arrangements will be examined in detail and the consequences for the political system discussed in terms of strategies and desired outcomes on the part of contestants. Students will research individual countries and analyze recent elections from both qualitative and quantitative perspectives, including introduction to geospatial data for mapping variations in electoral behavior. Counts as SAGES Departmental Seminar.

POSC 370A/470A
Political Economy
Elliot Posner
TR 10:00-11:15

Focus on debates concerning the proper relationship between political and economic systems, including conservative, liberal, and radical perspectives. The politics of international economics and the economics of international politics receive separate attention. The course concludes with study of “modern” political economy and the application of economic theory to the study of political systems.

POSC 370C/470C
The United States and Asia
Paul Schroeder
MWF 10:35-11:25

Survey and analysis of U.S.-Asia relations in the post-World War II period. Focus specifically is on the interaction of politics and economics in the United States’ relations with Japan, China, and Southeast Asian countries. Topics will include the role of Asia in U.S. Cold War policies, the dynamics of U.S.-Japan alliance politics, post-Cold War issues involving U.S. foreign policy toward Asia, a history and analysis of economic conflict cooperation, and an examination of the move toward Asia-Pacific “regionalism.”

POSC 371/471
Natural Resources and World Politics
Pete Moore
MW 12:45-2:00

Examination of the political causes and ramifications of the uneven distribution of the valuable natural resources for modern industrial societies. Strategic and military issues and the exploitation of the sea bed. Examination in some detail of selected commodity issues, including petroleum, copper and uranium.

POSC 373/473
Politics of the European Union
Elliot Posner
TR 2:30-3:45

Study of the origins, operations, and prospects for the European Union. This can include the historical context for the effort to restrict national rivalries (which fueled two world wars) and create common interests; the diplomatic challenges in finding common ground; the tasks and processes of governance within the EU, including its governing institutions, enforcement of terms for European Monetary Union and the operations of its bureaucracies; the social pressures that create policy challenges (such as agriculture policy and immigration); broad tensions within the enterprise (e.g., “broadening” vs. “deepening”), and the EU’s potential place in international politics, especially the efforts to create a common foreign and security policy and the possible implications of the Euro for international political economy.

POSC 374/474
Politics and Development in the Global South
Yu Jung (Julia) Lee

Exploration of the post-World War II emergence of the Global South nations of Africa, Asia, the Middle East, Latin America, and the Eastern Europe arena. Cross-listed as ETHS 374.

POSC 377/477
Politics of Russia
Kelly McMann
TR11:30-12:45

Russia faces three problems: the creation of a sovereign state, the development of a new political system, and the restructuring of its economy. In this course we will challenge the assumption that the outcome of these three transitions will be a strong, democratic, capitalist country. We will ask whether civil war, organized crime, an immature party system, poor social services, and nomenklatura privatization bode poorly for these three transformations. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement.

POSC 378/478
International Relations Theory
Kathryn Lavelle
TR 2:30-3:45

This course is a seminar in international relations theory. As such, we will bring a wide range of theoretical perspectives to bear on issues and debates in the area of international relations by systematically studying the evolution of the world system. The seminar is roughly divided into a first half focusing on war and the political system, and a second half focusing on trade, finance and the economic system. Each section devotes particular attention to ethical problems associated with political and economic issues. This course should develop students’ ability to read and critically evaluate academic literature in the field of international relations, and enable students to produce a scholarly paper on one substantive area of the field. Counts as SAGES Departmental Seminar.

POSC 395
Special Projects

(Requires consent and a permit from instructor)  Study of a topic of particular interest, or an approved internship. The student must submit to the departmental office a project prospectus form, approved and signed by the faculty supervisor, no later than the end of the second week of classes. The prospectus must outline the goals of the project and the research methodology to be used and is part of the basis for grading. The prospectus form is available from the departmental office of from the department’s Web page.

POSC 396
Senior Project SAGES Capstone
Times as Arranged

(Requires consent and a permit from instructor)  Capstone experience for political science majors or senior POSC minors as part of the SAGES program, providing opportunity to do an in-depth paper on a topic of particular interest to them. Students must obtain approval from a faculty project advisor and list that advisor on the registration form. The advisor must sign and student submit to the department a prospectus including goals, schedule, and research methodology. This paper should demonstrate, and ideally even extend, the skills and expertise developed over the course of study in the department. Upon completion of the capstone, students will be expected to present their work in a public forum. Recommended preparation: Junior or Senior political science major or senior political science minor and departmental prospectus form. Counts as SAGES Senior Capstone.

POSC 495
Independent Study
Staff
Times as Arranged

(Requires consent and a permit from instructor)  Independent study on particular topics that are not covered by individual graduate courses or are not available in a timely manner for the student’s needs.  In order to receive a permit, the student must complete a prospectus form, approved and signed by the faculty project supervisor and the student.  The prospectus must outline the material to be covered and the basis for grading of the course, and a copy of the form will be filed with the Department Office.  POSC 495 is designed especially for reading courses but can be used for other purposes as well.  Note that this course will result in a letter grade.  Graduate students wanting to take independent study on a pass/fail basis should speak with their project supervisors about registering for POSC 601, “Individual Investigation.”

POSC 601
Individual Investigation
Staff
Times as Arranged

(Requires consent and a permit from instructor)  POSC 601 permits a graduate student to do an in-depth study of a topic of particular interest for which no regular course is available.  It should be particularly helpful in preparing for field exams.  Students must develop their course of study with a supervising professor, who will set requirements for written work.

Credit (1-6 hours) and times as arranged.  Note that this course may be taken only on a pass/fail basis.  Graduate students who wish to do a project for a letter grade should speak with their supervising professors about registering for POSC 495, “Independent Study.”

IMPORTANT:  In order to obtain a permit, the student must complete a POSC 601 project prospectus form, signed by the faculty project advisor and the student, which will form the basis of a “contract” of expectations for the project.  The prospectus form, available in the Department Office (Mather House 111), will outline the goals of the project and the research methodology to be used and thus will be part of the basis for grading.  A copy of this completed and signed form will be filed with the Department Office.

POSC 651
M.A. Thesis Research
Staff
Times as Arranged

Independent study of a research question and completion of a major paper under advisor supervision. The School of Graduate Study requires 6 credit hours be completed.  The thesis will be reviewed by the advisor and a departmental committee.

POSC 701
Dissertation Ph.D.
Staff
Times as Arranged

(Requires consent and a permit from instructor)  Credit (1-9 hours) and times as arranged.  However, Graduate School regulations specify that a student must register for a minimum of 3 hours of 701 per semester until 18 hours of 701 credit have been completed.  After having earned 18 hours of 701, a candidate may be permitted to register for less than 3 hours per semester, but only with the prior approval of his/her dissertation advisor and only for a maximum of four semesters.  Thereafter, the student must resume registering for a minimum of 3 hours of 701 credit per semester until the dissertation is completed and defended.  See the Political Science Graduate Brochure or your POSC dissertation advisor for complete details on eligibility to register for 701.

Integrated Graduate Studies (IGS)
Special Program

It is possible for a qualified student to obtain an M.A. in Political Science simultaneously with, or shortly after, completion of the baccalaureate program.  If by the end of the senior year the student has completed successfully 90 undergraduate hours, 30 graduate hours (for a total of 120 hours), and the Political Science M.A. Examination, that student can receive both the Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees within the four undergraduate years.

Admission to the Political Science IGS program is competitive, and only a limited number of students are accepted in any academic year.  Admission is determined by fulfillment of specific requirements (see below), and by the Department’s estimate of the student’s potential for advanced study and independent work.

Phase I of IGS alerts the Department and the School of Graduate Studies to your interest in the program and allows the monitoring of your junior year for fulfillment of the undergraduate prerequisites to graduate study.  Application to Phase I must occur no later than second week of classes at the beginning of the junior year, but preferably earlier.  To qualify for Phase I, the student must have completed 54 hours of undergraduate work and must have minimum grade point averages of 3.7 in Political Science courses and 3.3 overall.

During Phase I, the student must complete 90 undergraduate hours (ordinarily by the end of the junior year) and must have satisfied all general requirements for the B.A., including at least 21 hours in the Political Science major, the Arts and Sciences Core Curriculum, and one minor program.  Included in the 21 Political Science hours must be one course each in American, Comparative, and International politics taken at CWRU.  Also, the student must maintain minimum GPAs of 3.5 in Political Science courses and 3.3 overall to qualify for admission to Phase II.

Before enrolling for any graduate-level course work, the student must be formally admitted to the School of Graduate Studies (Phase II of IGS).  Therefore, it is mandatory that application to Phase II occur during the second semester of the junior year, specifically no later than April 1 or November 1 (for graduate status to begin the following semester).  If admitted to the M.A. program, the student will take, or begin to take, 30 hours of graduate-level Political Science courses during the senior year, adhering to all departmental regulations governing the Master’s degree program; and if completed successfully with maintenance of academic standing as pertains to both the B.A. and M.A. programs, these hours will count simultaneously toward both degrees in Political Science.  The B.A. will be awarded upon completion of all requirements for that degree, including total hours; the M.A. will be awarded upon successful completion of the 30 hours of graduate-level Political Science courses and the M.A. Examination or Thesis.

For additional information on application procedures and program requirements, make an appointment to see Professor Pete Moore  (Mather House 219, 368-5265, e-mail: pete.moore@case.edu).

All courses are offered for 3 credit hours unless otherwise noted. 

Course Number Course Name  Days/Times  Faculty
POSC 109 The U.S. Political System  MWF 10:35-11:25 Karen Beckwith
POSC 160 Introduction to Comparative Politics (Counts for CAS Global and Cultural Diversity Requirement) TR 2:30-3:45 Pete Moore
POSC 172 Introduction to International Relations TR 10:00-11:15 MWF 11:40-12:30 Elliot Posner
Paul Schroeder
POSC 306/406 Interest Groups in the Policy Process MW 12:45-2:00 Joseph White
POSC 321/421 News Media and Politics MWF 9:30-10:20 Girma Parris
POSC 326/426 Constitutions in Practical Politics TR 4:00-5:15 Laura Tartakoff
POSC 328/428 Topics in Civil Liberties TR 11:30-12:45 Laura Tartakoff
POSC 349/449 Research Methods MWF 11:40-12:30 Justin Buchler
POSC 370H/470H China’s Foreign Policy MW 12:45-2:00 Paul Schroeder
POSC 370M/470M Theories of Political Economy TR 4:00-5:15 Kathryn Lavelle
POSC 375/475 The International Politics of Technology TR 2:30-3:45 Elliot Posner
POSC 376/476 United States Foreign Policy TR 11:30-12:45 Kathryn Lavelle
POSC 379/479 Introduction to Middle East Politics TR 10:00-11:15 Pete Moore
POSC 382A Child Policy MW 3:20-4:35 Gabriella Celeste
POSC 383/483 Health Policy and Politics in the United States MWF 3:20-4:10 Joseph White
POSC 384/484 Ethics and Public Policy MW 3:20-4:35 Jeremy Bendik-Keymer
POSC 389 Special Topics in American Politics and Policy: Race, Immigration and American Political Development MWF 2:15-3:05 Girma Parris
POSC 391 Special Topics in Comparative Politics: The Poltiics and Government of India MW 3:20-4:35 Julia Lee
POSC 391 Special Topics in Comparative Politics: Women and Politics in Global Perspective TR 1:00-2:15 Julia Lee
POSC 395 Special Projects (1-6 credit hours. Prerequisites: see description) Times as arranged Staff
POSC 396 Senior Project/SAGES Capstone (Prerequisites: See description) Times as arranged Staff
POSC 495 Independent Study  (Graduate students only. Must be taken for a letter grade. Prerequisites: See description) Times as arranged Staff
POSC 601 Individual Investigation  (1-6 credit hours. Graduate students only. May be taken only on a pass/fail basis. Prerequisites: See description) Times as arranged Staff
POSC 651 M.A. Thesis Research  (6 credit hours. Graduate students only. Permission from supervisor and graduate committee is required. Grade is for the thesis itself, so Satisfactory or Unsatisfactory) Times as arranged Staff
POSC 701 Dissertation Ph.D.  (1-9 credit hours. Prerequisites: see description) Times as arranged Staff
Integrated Graduate Studies (See description)

POSC 109
The U.S. Political System                                                                                      

Karen Beckwith
MWF 10:35-11:25

This course provides an overview of governmental institutions and processes in the United States, the political forces that combine to shape them, and how we might best understand the system that government and politics create.

POSC 160
Introduction to Comparative Politics                                                                      

Pete Moore
TR 2:30-3:45

Comparative politics is the study of processes and institutions within countries.  Prompted by real-world puzzles, comparativists investigate broad, theoretical questions:  What constitutes a revolution, and why do revolutions occur?  How does one country become more democratic than another?  Why do relations between some ethnic groups turn violent?  This course introduces some of the central puzzles and theories of comparative politics in order to help students better understand world events. Counts as CAS Global and Cultural Diversity Requirement.

POSC 172
Introduction to International Relations
Elliot Posner
TR 10:00-11:15
Paul Schroeder
MWF 11:40-12:30                                

Why do countries fight wars?  Can nuclear proliferation be curtailed?  Does trade help developing countries or harm them?  This survey of the field of International Relations examines “big questions” in world politics.  It introduces themes including the rise, development and changes of the nation-state system; patterns and causes of international conflict and cooperation; international law, organizations, and transnational institutions; the roles of both state and non-state actors in international politics; and the methods used to understand this field.

POSC 306/406
Interest Groups in the Policy Process
Joseph White
MW 12:45-2:00

Introduction to the institutions and processes that make up the political environment of nonprofit and other organizations in the United States, beginning with an examination of the role of civil society in a democracy and continuing with the framing of issues, role of political entrepreneurs and organized interests, elections, the legislative process and strategies for influencing it, and the roles of executive institutions and the courts.

POSC 321/421
News Media and Politics
Girma Parris
MWF 9:30-10:20

This course traces the evolution of the media from an appendage of the American Party system to the so called fourth branch of government and how its influence on the political system has changed with its maturation. A central theme of the course will be an investigation of the changing normative conceptions concerning the role of the media in a popular democracy: When did fake news become objective journalism? Is the news now fake or objective? And why does this matter? These are some of the issues that students will address in class and in written assignment/ class examination.

POSC 326/426
Constitutions in Practical Politics
Laura Tartakoff
TR 4:00-5:15

Overview of ancient Greek and Roman constitution-making, medieval principles, emergence of modern constitutionalism, and the constitutionalist vision of the American and French Revolutions. Examination of contemporary constitutional issues and developments in countries such as Canada, France, Germany, Great Britain, Ethiopia, India, and the United States. Counts as CAS Global and Cultural Diversity Requirement.

POSC 328/428
Topics in Civil Liberties
Laura Tartakoff
TR 11:30-12:45

Rights of the accused as outlined in the Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, and Eighth Amendments.  Topics covered are (1) arrests, searches, and seizures, (2) the privilege against compelled self-incrimination, (3) the rights to counsel, confrontation, and jury trial, and (4) the prohibition against cruel and unusual punishments.  Case-specific approach but presents interplay of history, philosophy, and politics as background of each topic.

POSC 349/449
Research Methods
Justin Buchler
MWF 11:40-12:30

This course examines approaches that political scientists use to understand events and processes.  In doing so, the course provides students with skills helpful to completing senior projects, such as the ability to evaluate and conduct research.  Through exercises and projects, students will take part in the research process from constructing a question to developing a research design to interpreting results.  Students will learn and apply key techniques, including inductive and deductive reasoning, hypothesis construction, operationalization of concepts, measurements, sampling and probability, causal inference, and the logic of controls.  They will produce materials common to the discipline, such as research designs. SAGES departmental seminar.

POSC 370H/470H
China’s Foreign Policy
Paul Schroeder
MW 12:45-2:00

The rise of China is evident in the country’s more forward and robust foreign policy that began in 1979.  At every turn, nations throughout the world must now consider China wherever their interests are at stake, be it Korea and Northeast Asia, Indochina and Southeast Asia, India/Pakistan and South Asia, or Afghanistan and Iran in the Middle East, not to mention the many African states that welcome Chinese investment but chafe at China’s presence.  Further, China is increasingly aggressive in international trade, a major determinant of its foreign policy.  This course describes the key factors that make up Chinese foreign policy, including its cultural tradition, policy-making institutions, the role of the military, and domestic determinants of foreign policy.  The course also examines China’s ever-changing foreign policy strategies, from an aggressive posture to charming its neighbors only to become more strident once again.  The course will also examine China’s role involving possible mercantilism, currency manipulation, and the hunt for traditional and alternative energy sources.  Throughout the course, we will pay attention to how China’s foreign policy relates to international relations theories and what strategies might be used to manage China’s growing role in international affairs.

POSC 370M/470M
Theories of Political Economy
Kathryn Lavelle
TR 4:00-5:15

This course is a SAGES departmental seminar in political economy that brings a wide range of theoretical perspectives to bear on the relations between market and state in the contemporary world. It focuses on three questions: What have been the major debates concerning the role of the government in the economy?  How were these debates resolved in the compromise of embedded liberalism, and What experiences have individual states had with these questions of political economy? To answer these questions, we will read original literature to uncover the connections among politics, economics, and the world of ideas that has resulted in the political debates we confront today. . SAGES departmental seminar.

POSC 375/475
The International Politics of Technology
Elliot Posner
TR 2:30-3:45

Technology is deeply political.  Nowhere is this statement more evident than in the realm of international relations, where governments perceive technology as a source of power and wealth and a symbol of relative position and modernity.  Yet for centuries skeptics have questioned the economic rationale of government technology policies.  Still, to this day, countries support emulation, innovation and a host of other strategies as means for catching up with leading nations or locking in current advantages.  What lies behind such policies?  What do they accomplish?  And what are the domestic and international politics surrounding them? After reading classic arguments, including texts by Adam Smith, Alexander Hamilton and Friedrich List, students will consider 20th and 21st century debates and an array of experiments tried by poor, middle-income and rich countries.  Cases include the development of new industries; the imposition of sanctions; the dilemma of dual technologies and military spillovers; the forging of national champions; the reorganization of banks and the creation of international financial centers; the copying of regional clusters (e.g. Silicon Valley) and stock markets (e.g. the Nasdaq); and the extraterritorial extension of domestic regulation and governance techniques.  There are no prerequisites and first year students are welcome. SAGES departmental seminar.

POSC 376/476
United States Foreign Policy
Kathryn Lavelle
TR 11:30-12:45

Focus on U.S. foreign policy making with a dynamic network of executive and congressional actors and organizations; analysis of traditional and contemporary U.S. foreign policies from nuclear defense to current economic resource issues; future role of the United States in world affairs.

POSC 379/479
Introduction to Middle East Politics
Pete Moore
TR 10:00-11:15

This is an introductory course about Middle East Politics, in regional as well as international aspects.  In this course we will explore broad social, economic, and political themes that have defined the region since the end of World War Two.  Since this is an introductory course, a major goal will be to gain comparative knowledge about the region’s states and peoples.  The countries that comprise the modern Middle East are quite diverse; therefore, we will only be able to focus on a few cases in depth.  A second goal is to use the tools and theories social scientists employ to answer broad questions related to the region, such as: How have colonial legacies shaped political and economic development in the Middle East?  How do oil, religion, and identity interact with politics?  How have external powers affected the region’s political development?  What do the uprisings of 2011 hold for the region’s future? Counts as CAS Global and Cultural Diversity Requirement.

POSC 382A
Child Policy
Gabriella Celeste
MW 3:20-4:35

This course introduces students to issues in public policy that impact children and families. Local, state, and federal child policy will be considered, and topics will include, for example, policies related to child poverty, education, child welfare, juvenile justice, and children’s physical and mental health. Students will learn how policy is developed, how research informs policy and vice versa, and a framework for analyzing social policy. Recommended preparation: One social sciences course or consent. Cross-listed as ANTH 305 and CHST 301.

POSC 383/483
Health Policy and Politics in the United States
Joseph White
MWF 3:20-4:10

Overview of the principal institutions, processes, social forces, and ideas shaping the U.S. health system.  Historical, political, economic, and sociological perspectives on the health system are explored as well as the intellectual context of recent policy changes, challenges, and developments.  Students will acquire a sense of how health services are financed and delivered in the U.S.  They will also learn how to assess its performance compared to that of other similar countries.

POSC 384/484
Ethics and Public Policy
Jeremy Bendik-Keymer
MW 3:20-4:35

Evaluation of ethical arguments in contemporary public policymaking discourse.  That is, approaches to evaluating not only the efficiency of policy (Will this policy achieve its end for the least cost?) but also the ethics of policy (Are a policy’s intended ends ethically justified or “good,” and are our means to achieve those ends moral or “just”?).  Overview of political ideologies that supply U.S. political actors with their ethical or moral arguments when proposing and implementing public policy, followed by an application of these differing perspectives to selected policy areas such as welfare, euthanasia, school choice, drug laws, censorship, or others. Cross-listed as PHIL 384/484.

POSC 389
Special Topics in American Politics and Policy: Race, Immigration and American Political Development 
Girma Parris
MWF 2:15-3:05

This course takes a historical look at the politics of race and immigration as a means of not only detailing its history but in brining into relief the historical lineage of contemporary issues in the politics of race and the politics of immigration. The course will look at the historical origins of (but not limited to) the following contemporary issues: undocumented immigration, nativism. refugee policy, police brutality, residential segregation, mass incarceration and socioeconomic gaps that correlate with race and ethnicity. A secondary goal of the course is to show how historically the politics of race and immigration have interacted and/ or reinforced policy developments in the other. This has led to political developments in race/ immigration often reinforcing or spurring political development in the other. In addressing this secondary goal, the course will investigate the institutional and political foundations of the socio economic hierarchies that have developed along race and ethnic lines. Written assignments, class discussion and class examinations will be oriented towards the investigatory aims of these two goals.

POSC 391/491
Special Topics in Comparative Politics: The Poltiics and Government of India
Julia Lee
MW 3:20-4:35

As the world’s largest democracy, India is a prominent country in global affairs today. This course provides an introduction to the political structure and policymaking process that shape development in contemporary India. The main questions we address are: How has India’s democracy thrived in a country with numerous religious, linguistic, ethnic, and economic groups? How does politics help explain India’s rapid economic growth on one hand and widespread poverty on the other? What are the major challenges of India’s democracy today? Some of the topics we will cover include: colonial legacies, government institutions, elections and political parties, decentralization, identity politics, poverty, civil society, and corruption. Using India as a guide, the course will cover concepts and themes that are useful for analyzing politics in other developing countries.

POSC 391/491
Special Topics in Comparative Politics: Women and Politics in Global Perspective
Julia Lee
TR 1:00-2:15

This course is an introduction to the comparative study of women’s participation in politics from an international perspective. The main questions we focus on are: Does the descriptive representation of women lead to their substantive representation? Do gender quotas promote women’s representation? Do women make a difference once elected to office? What are the main obstacles to women’s representation? How has public opinion changed with respect to women in politics? The course will provide an opportunity for students to read and discuss empirical, qualitative, and theoretical scholarship on the role of women in politics with a focus on developing countries. Course readings are organized under four sections: representation and impact, women’s political participation, culture and attitudes toward women, and transnational issues concerning women. As part of the course grade, students will be expected to write an original research paper.  No prerequisite.

POSC 395
Special Projects

(Requires consent and a permit from instructor)  Study of a topic of particular interest, or an approved internship. The student must submit to the departmental office a project prospectus form, approved and signed by the faculty supervisor, no later than the end of the second week of classes. The prospectus must outline the goals of the project and the research methodology to be used and is part of the basis for grading. The prospectus form is available from the departmental office of from the department’s Web page.

POSC 396
Senior Project SAGES Capstone
Times as Arranged

(Requires consent and a permit from instructor)  Capstone experience for political science majors or senior POSC minors as part of the SAGES program, providing opportunity to do an in-depth paper on a topic of particular interest to them. Students must obtain approval from a faculty project advisor and list that advisor on the registration form. The advisor must sign and student submit to the department a prospectus including goals, schedule, and research methodology. This paper should demonstrate, and ideally even extend, the skills and expertise developed over the course of study in the department. Upon completion of the capstone, students will be expected to present their work in a public forum. Recommended preparation: Junior or Senior political science major or senior political science minor and departmental prospectus form. Counts as SAGES Senior Capstone.

POSC 495
Independent Study
Staff
Times as Arranged

(Requires consent and a permit from instructor)  Independent study on particular topics that are not covered by individual graduate courses or are not available in a timely manner for the student’s needs.  In order to receive a permit, the student must complete a prospectus form, approved and signed by the faculty project supervisor and the student.  The prospectus must outline the material to be covered and the basis for grading of the course, and a copy of the form will be filed with the Department Office.  POSC 495 is designed especially for reading courses but can be used for other purposes as well.  Note that this course will result in a letter grade.  Graduate students wanting to take independent study on a pass/fail basis should speak with their project supervisors about registering for POSC 601, “Individual Investigation.”

POSC 601
Individual Investigation
Staff
Times as Arranged

(Requires consent and a permit from instructor)  POSC 601 permits a graduate student to do an in-depth study of a topic of particular interest for which no regular course is available.  It should be particularly helpful in preparing for field exams.  Students must develop their course of study with a supervising professor, who will set requirements for written work.

Credit (1-6 hours) and times as arranged.  Note that this course may be taken only on a pass/fail basis.  Graduate students who wish to do a project for a letter grade should speak with their supervising professors about registering for POSC 495, “Independent Study.”

IMPORTANT:  In order to obtain a permit, the student must complete a POSC 601 project prospectus form, signed by the faculty project advisor and the student, which will form the basis of a “contract” of expectations for the project.  The prospectus form, available in the Department Office (Mather House 111), will outline the goals of the project and the research methodology to be used and thus will be part of the basis for grading.  A copy of this completed and signed form will be filed with the Department Office.

POSC 651
M.A. Thesis Research
Staff
Times as Arranged

Independent study of a research question and completion of a major paper under advisor supervision. The School of Graduate Study requires 6 credit hours be completed.  The thesis will be reviewed by the advisor and a departmental committee.

POSC 701
Dissertation Ph.D.
Staff
Times as Arranged

(Requires consent and a permit from instructor)  Credit (1-9 hours) and times as arranged.  However, Graduate School regulations specify that a student must register for a minimum of 3 hours of 701 per semester until 18 hours of 701 credit have been completed.  After having earned 18 hours of 701, a candidate may be permitted to register for less than 3 hours per semester, but only with the prior approval of his/her dissertation advisor and only for a maximum of four semesters.  Thereafter, the student must resume registering for a minimum of 3 hours of 701 credit per semester until the dissertation is completed and defended.  See the Political Science Graduate Brochure or your POSC dissertation advisor for complete details on eligibility to register for 701.

Integrated Graduate Studies (IGS)
Special Program

It is possible for a qualified student to obtain an M.A. in Political Science simultaneously with, or shortly after, completion of the baccalaureate program.  If by the end of the senior year the student has completed successfully 90 undergraduate hours, 30 graduate hours (for a total of 120 hours), and the Political Science M.A. Examination, that student can receive both the Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees within the four undergraduate years.

Admission to the Political Science IGS program is competitive, and only a limited number of students are accepted in any academic year.  Admission is determined by fulfillment of specific requirements (see below), and by the Department’s estimate of the student’s potential for advanced study and independent work.

Phase I of IGS alerts the Department and the School of Graduate Studies to your interest in the program and allows the monitoring of your junior year for fulfillment of the undergraduate prerequisites to graduate study.  Application to Phase I must occur no later than second week of classes at the beginning of the junior year, but preferably earlier.  To qualify for Phase I, the student must have completed 54 hours of undergraduate work and must have minimum grade point averages of 3.7 in Political Science courses and 3.3 overall.

During Phase I, the student must complete 90 undergraduate hours (ordinarily by the end of the junior year) and must have satisfied all general requirements for the B.A., including at least 21 hours in the Political Science major, the Arts and Sciences Core Curriculum, and one minor program.  Included in the 21 Political Science hours must be one course each in American, Comparative, and International politics taken at CWRU.  Also, the student must maintain minimum GPAs of 3.5 in Political Science courses and 3.3 overall to qualify for admission to Phase II.

Before enrolling for any graduate-level course work, the student must be formally admitted to the School of Graduate Studies (Phase II of IGS).  Therefore, it is mandatory that application to Phase II occur during the second semester of the junior year, specifically no later than April 1 or November 1 (for graduate status to begin the following semester).  If admitted to the M.A. program, the student will take, or begin to take, 30 hours of graduate-level Political Science courses during the senior year, adhering to all departmental regulations governing the Master’s degree program; and if completed successfully with maintenance of academic standing as pertains to both the B.A. and M.A. programs, these hours will count simultaneously toward both degrees in Political Science.  The B.A. will be awarded upon completion of all requirements for that degree, including total hours; the M.A. will be awarded upon successful completion of the 30 hours of graduate-level Political Science courses and the M.A. Examination or Thesis.

For additional information on application procedures and program requirements, make an appointment to see Professor Pete Moore  (Mather House 219, 368-5265, e-mail: pete.moore@case.edu).

All courses are offered for 3 credit hours unless otherwise noted. 

Course Number Course Name  Days/Times  Faculty
POSC 109 The U.S. Political System  TR 1:00-2:15 Joseph White
POSC 160 Introduction to Comparative Politics (Counts for CAS Global and Cultural Diversity Requirement) TR 10:00-11:15 Kelly McMann
POSC 172 Introduction to International Relations  TR 11:30-12:45 Kathryn Lavelle
POSC 319/419 Politics and Money MWF 2:15-3:05 Justin Buchler
POSC 322/422 Political Movements and Protest MW 12:45-2:00 Karen Beckwith
POSC 323/423 Judicial Politics M 7:00-9:30 Michael Wager
POSC 327/427 Civil Liberties in America TR 11:30-12:45 Laura Tartakoff
POSC 358/458 Political Strategy MWF 11:40-12:30 Justin Buchler
POSC 369/469 Ethnicity, Gender, and Religion in Latin American Politics and Society TR 4:00-5:15 Laura Tartakoff
POSC 370F/470F Financial Politics in the United States and the World TR 2:30-3:45 Kathryn Lavelle
POSC 373/473 Politics of the European Union MW 12:45-2:00 Elliot Posner
POSC 37474 Politics of Development in the Global South TR 1:00-2:15 Paul Schroeder
POSC 386/486 Making Public Policy TR 10:00-11:15 Joseph White
POSC 390/490 Special Topics in International Relations: Power, Law and International Order MW 3:20-4:35 Elliot Posner
POSC 395 Special Projects (1-6 credit hours. Prerequisites: see description) Times as arranged Staff
POSC 396 Senior Project/SAGES Capstone (Prerequisites: See description) Times as arranged Staff
POSC 495 Independent Study  (Graduate students only. Must be taken for a letter grade. Prerequisites: See description) Times as arranged Staff
POSC 601 Individual Investigation  (1-6 credit hours. Graduate students only. May be taken only on a pass/fail basis. Prerequisites: See description) Times as arranged Staff
POSC 651 M.A. Thesis Research  (6 credit hours. Graduate students only. Permission from supervisor and graduate committee is required. Grade is for the thesis itself, so Satisfactory or Unsatisfactory) Times as arranged Staff
POSC 701 Dissertation Ph.D.  (1-9 credit hours. Prerequisites: see description) Times as arranged Staff
Integrated Graduate Studies (See description)

POSC 109
The U.S. Political System                                                                                      

Joseph White
TR 1:00-2:15

The U.S. political system was created to bring cooperation, the ability to work together for public ends, out of conflict, the disagreements about ends and means that were common in 1787 and at least as common now. That is the fundamental task of government, and how well that works depends on how much people disagree (beliefs) the rules of the game (how political authority is exercised), and the policy environment (the severity of problems, such as economic conditions or security threats). For this class the basic questions involve what Americans fight about through politics, how decisions are made, whether decisions tend to favor some groups of people over others, and whether decisions can be made at all.

With those questions in mind we will survey the basic institutions and dynamics of the U.S. political system. These include public and elite attitudes and why they matter; how attitudes are mobilized to influence the government, through political parties, interest groups and the media; the separated institutions that share powers to make governmental decisions, such as Congress, the presidency, courts and government agencies: and the elections which link mobilized attitudes to who holds office in the government.

POSC 160
Introduction to Comparative Politics                                                                      

Kelly McMann
TR 10:00-11:15

Comparative politics is the study of processes and institutions within countries.  Prompted by real-world puzzles, comparativists investigate broad, theoretical questions:  What constitutes a revolution, and why do revolutions occur?  How does one country become more democratic than another?  Why do relations between some ethnic groups turn violent?  This course introduces some of the central puzzles and theories of comparative politics in order to help students better understand world events. Counts for CAS Global and Cultural Diversity Requirement.

POSC 172
Introduction to International Relations
Kathryn Lavelle

TR 11:30-12:45

This course is a survey of international relations.  It will address the major questions about the ways that states interact: what is anarchy, and what are its consequences?  Can we mitigate its effects, and if so how?  Has globalization—the increasing flows of goods, people and knowledge across borders—changed the nature of the way states relate to each other?  Has the rise of non-state actors diminished the authority of the state?  This course will take up these large questions by examining the nature of anarchy and sovereignty and their effects in world politics.  It will also ask under what conditions can international cooperation—through treaties, laws and less formal arrangements—help provide peace, security and prosperity.  The course will cover the fundaments of the discipline, including a review of the theoretical approaches and major questions in contemporary international relations.  We will also look at specific issues in contemporary world politics such as human rights, environmental protection and other issues decided upon by the class.

POSC 319/419
Politics and Money
Justin Buchler
MWF 2:15-3:05

One of the most famous definitions of politics comes from Harold Laswell, who described it as the struggle over “who gets what, when, how.”  Money is at the center of most political conflict.  It is a resource, a motivation, and an end unto itself.  This course will examine the role of money in politics, with particular emphasis on American politics.  We will discuss the role of money in elections, in the policy-making process, and what it means for representation.  The course will begin with the question of the role that financial consideration play in public opinion and voting behavior.  We will then address the role that money plays in election results, both in terms of its role in financing campaigns, and the relationship between the state of the economy and election results.  Finally, we will discuss the policy-making process.  In that context, we will address the role that interest groups play in the process, and how the quest for economic benefits for one’s constituency motivates the behavior of elected officials.  We will conclude by discussing how policy changes at the systematic level occur and the influence that various groups have on policy outcomes.

POSC 322/422
Political Movements and Protest
Karen Beckwith
MW 12:45-2:00

Political Movements and Political Participation is concerned with the variety of ways citizens engage in collective activism in the United States and across national boundaries, and with the conditions under which citizens identify common concerns and join together in political movements to bring about change.  The course begins with an examination of three general bodies of theory and research on political movements: resource mobilization, political opportunity structures, and cultural framing.  We will also investigate frameworks of political participation for understanding the relationships among different expressions of collective activism and representation.  In the context of these sometimes competing theories, we will consider 1) the conditions under which political movements are likely to emerge, as well as the circumstances in which collective political action is precluded; 2) how citizens come to recognize collective grievances and shared political identities; 3) the strategies and tactics of organized movements, and their likelihood of political success; and 4) the relationship between political movements, political parties, and the state.

POSC 323/423
Judicial Politics
Michael Wager
M 7:00-9:30

Rejecting the view that judges mechanically apply the law, the study of judicial politics seeks to understand the behavior of judges as political actors with policy goals. Topics include judicial selection and socialization, judicial policy change, judicial strategy (especially the strategic interaction of judges on multi-judge panels), the interaction of courts in hierarchical judicial systems, the policy impact of judicial decisions, and the courts’ interactions with coordinate branches of government (the executive, Congress, state governments, state courts). Primary focus will be on the federal judiciary, with some discussion of state judicial systems.

POSC 327/427
Civil Liberties in America
Laura Tartakoff
TR 11:30-12:45

Supreme Court’s interpretation of the First Amendment: liberty of religion through the establishment and free exercise clauses, freedoms of speech and the press, of assembly and association.  The “pure tolerance” view examined against subversive speech, “fighting words,” libel, and obscenity.  Survey of content-neutral regulation, symbolic expression, and current efforts to limit expression (campus speech codes and the feminist anti-pornography movement).

POSC 358/458
Political Strategy
Justin Buchler
MWF 11:40-12:30

This course examines practical applications of prominent political science theories.  It is partly a how-to course covering a broad range of political activities, but the primary objective is to link practical issues with theories to help you understand why events happen the way they do.  The course focuses on American politics, but the materials will be applicable to a wide range of situations.  The course is a seminar requiring regular student presentations that will generate discussion about the readings and current events. Papers consist of analysis of current events, and require students to analyze the strategies used by prominent figures in the context of the theories we discuss in class. 

POSC 369/469
Ehtnicity, Gender, and Religion in Latin American Politics and Society
Laura Tartakoff
TR 4:00-5:15

This course focuses on aspects of Latin America’s social and political realities and dilemmas.  It will first explore race, gender, and religion, and then tackle revolution, democracy and populism.  Throughout, the entire region’s history, geography, and culture(s) will be considered; for example, the European and indigenous legacies in Mexico and Peru, Bolivia, Chile, and Ecuador; the Asian presence in Peru and Brazil; the African contributions to Cuba and Brazil, female heads of state, such as Nicaragua’s Violeta Chamorro, Chile’s Michelle Bachelet, Argentina’s Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner, Costa Rica’s Laura Chinchilla, and Brazil’s Dilma Rousseff.  The class will explore Liberation Theology and the new Pope’s worries about the declining number of Catholics in the region.
Today’s multiparty democracy in Mexico, Hugo Chavez’s 14-year rule in Venezuela, and Cuba’s international humanitarian aid would not be possible without revolution(s) and populism.  They are intertwined with ethnicity, gender, and religion.

POSC 370F/470F
Financial Politics in the United States and the World
Kathryn Lavelle
TR 2:30-3:45

This course explores how political institutions make policy in the financial area with particular emphasis on the United States.  Using a bureaucratic politics framework, it examines money, banks and the securities industry by integrating a wide range of literature in economics and political science.  Specific objectives include familiarizing students with different approaches to the political economy of finance from different disciplines, exploring the historical evolution of finance, examining the changing relationship between public and private authority within the financial system, considering how politics operates in a crisis, and evaluating the role of international financial institutions in the global economy.  By taking this course, students will equip themselves for further research into politics and economics, as well as offer them tools to analyze future policy developments as they unfold.

POSC 373/473
Politics of the European Union
Elliot Posner
MW 12:45-2:00

The evolution of the European Union ranks among the most significant developments in contemporary European and international history.  Yet scholars have disagreed about nearly every important aspect of the EU’s origins, nature and implications; And now they argue about whether and how it can endure a conjuncture of challenges and crises. The seminar’s readings, discussions and written assignments will introduce students to the main debates by addressing five questions:  What is the EU? What accounts for its origins and evolution?  How does the EU work and what does it do?  What impact has it had on the national societies, polities and economies of Europe?  How does the EU influence relations among members, neighboring countries, global society and international politics and economics?  The class will cover topical contemporary developments including the politics surrounding the massive inflow of refugees, the ongoing banking crises, security threats from Russia and extremists, the UK’s departure and authoritarian tendencies of some member state governments.

POSC 374/474
Politics of Development in the Global South
Paul Schroeder
TR 1:00-2:15

Exploration of the post-World War II emergence of the Global South nations of Africa, Asia, the Middle East, Latin America, and the Eastern Europe arena.

POSC 386/486
Making Public Policy
Joseph White
TR 10:00-11:15

Politics is about who wins, who loses, and why.  Policy, by contrast, is often depicted as more “neutral;” policies are the means through which political decisions are carried out.  In this class, we examine the notion that policy is the rational, impartial counterpart to the political arena.  We will ask: How are public policies made?  Why do some issues make it on to the agenda, while others do not?  Can we separate facts from values, or are both always contested?  We will examine how decision-making in a group introduces distinct challenges for policymaking.  The course focuses on widely applicable themes of policymaking, drawing on both domestic and international examples.

POSC 390/490
Special Topics in IR: Power, Law, and International Order
Elliot Posner
MW 3:20-4:35

This special topics seminar in International Relations varies from semester to semester depending on the interests of the department’s faculty.  Students may take the course more than once (for up to 9 credits) so long as the topics are different.

In the spring of 2017, the seminar will focus on three topics related to the concept of international order.  The first – its contested nature – addresses deep scholarly divisions over the meaning of international order; its relationship to peace, stability, prosperity and war; whether it can be engineered by world leaders and, if so, how; and where it should rank in the hierarchy of their goals.  The second topic – governance – explores how international law and institutions intersect with a changing distribution of power among states.  Most analysts have focused on formal international organizations (such as the World Trade Organization), asking whether they can accommodate “rising” powers (mainly China but also Brazil, India and Russia).  This unit will instead give special attention to informal organizations (that is, non-treaty-based ones) and international soft law (that is, agreed, codified, yet non-binding rules), on the one hand, and authoritarian regimes such as China and Russia, on the other.  Does regime type matter?  The final topic – transnationalism – considers the potential ordering effects of cross-border networks (housed in international human rights and environmental advocacy organizations, industry and professional associations or regulatory bodies) and their ideas.  Do these networks foster similarity (in political culture, regulatory approaches, domestic state-society-market relationships, etc.) that subsequently supports international cooperation and institutional order?  The readings for this seminar will draw from classic works and contemporary research.

POSC 395
Special Projects

(Requires consent and a permit from instructor)  Study of a topic of particular interest, or an approved internship. The student must submit to the departmental office a project prospectus form, approved and signed by the faculty supervisor, no later than the end of the second week of classes. The prospectus must outline the goals of the project and the research methodology to be used and is part of the basis for grading. The prospectus form is available from the departmental office of from the department’s Web page.

POSC 396
Senior Project SAGES Capstone
Times as Arranged

(Requires consent and a permit from instructor)  Capstone experience for political science majors or senior POSC minors as part of the SAGES program, providing opportunity to do an in-depth paper on a topic of particular interest to them. Students must obtain approval from a faculty project advisor and list that advisor on the registration form. The advisor must sign and student submit to the department a prospectus including goals, schedule, and research methodology. This paper should demonstrate, and ideally even extend, the skills and expertise developed over the course of study in the department. Upon completion of the capstone, students will be expected to present their work in a public forum. Recommended preparation: Junior or Senior political science major or senior political science minor and departmental prospectus form. Counts as SAGES Senior Capstone.

POSC 495
Independent Study
Staff
Times as Arranged

(Requires consent and a permit from instructor)  Independent study on particular topics that are not covered by individual graduate courses or are not available in a timely manner for the student’s needs.  In order to receive a permit, the student must complete a prospectus form, approved and signed by the faculty project supervisor and the student.  The prospectus must outline the material to be covered and the basis for grading of the course, and a copy of the form will be filed with the Department Office.  POSC 495 is designed especially for reading courses but can be used for other purposes as well.  Note that this course will result in a letter grade.  Graduate students wanting to take independent study on a pass/fail basis should speak with their project supervisors about registering for POSC 601, “Individual Investigation.”

POSC 601
Individual Investigation
Staff
Times as Arranged

(Requires consent and a permit from instructor)  POSC 601 permits a graduate student to do an in-depth study of a topic of particular interest for which no regular course is available.  It should be particularly helpful in preparing for field exams.  Students must develop their course of study with a supervising professor, who will set requirements for written work.

Credit (1-6 hours) and times as arranged.  Note that this course may be taken only on a pass/fail basis.  Graduate students who wish to do a project for a letter grade should speak with their supervising professors about registering for POSC 495, “Independent Study.”

IMPORTANT:  In order to obtain a permit, the student must complete a POSC 601 project prospectus form, signed by the faculty project advisor and the student, which will form the basis of a “contract” of expectations for the project.  The prospectus form, available in the Department Office (Mather House 111), will outline the goals of the project and the research methodology to be used and thus will be part of the basis for grading.  A copy of this completed and signed form will be filed with the Department Office.

POSC 651
M.A. Thesis Research
Staff
Times as Arranged

Independent study of a research question and completion of a major paper under advisor supervision. The School of Graduate Study requires 6 credit hours be completed.  The thesis will be reviewed by the advisor and a departmental committee.

POSC 701
Dissertation Ph.D.
Staff
Times as Arranged

(Requires consent and a permit from instructor)  Credit (1-9 hours) and times as arranged.  However, Graduate School regulations specify that a student must register for a minimum of 3 hours of 701 per semester until 18 hours of 701 credit have been completed.  After having earned 18 hours of 701, a candidate may be permitted to register for less than 3 hours per semester, but only with the prior approval of his/her dissertation advisor and only for a maximum of four semesters.  Thereafter, the student must resume registering for a minimum of 3 hours of 701 credit per semester until the dissertation is completed and defended.  See the Political Science Graduate Brochure or your POSC dissertation advisor for complete details on eligibility to register for 701.

Integrated Graduate Studies (IGS)
Special Program

It is possible for a qualified student to obtain an M.A. in Political Science simultaneously with, or shortly after, completion of the baccalaureate program.  If by the end of the senior year the student has completed successfully 90 undergraduate hours, 30 graduate hours (for a total of 120 hours), and the Political Science M.A. Examination, that student can receive both the Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees within the four undergraduate years.

Admission to the Political Science IGS program is competitive, and only a limited number of students are accepted in any academic year.  Admission is determined by fulfillment of specific requirements (see below), and by the Department’s estimate of the student’s potential for advanced study and independent work.

Phase I of IGS alerts the Department and the School of Graduate Studies to your interest in the program and allows the monitoring of your junior year for fulfillment of the undergraduate prerequisites to graduate study.  Application to Phase I must occur no later than second week of classes at the beginning of the junior year, but preferably earlier.  To qualify for Phase I, the student must have completed 54 hours of undergraduate work and must have minimum grade point averages of 3.7 in Political Science courses and 3.3 overall.

During Phase I, the student must complete 90 undergraduate hours (ordinarily by the end of the junior year) and must have satisfied all general requirements for the B.A., including at least 21 hours in the Political Science major, the Arts and Sciences Core Curriculum, and one minor program.  Included in the 21 Political Science hours must be one course each in American, Comparative, and International politics taken at CWRU.  Also, the student must maintain minimum GPAs of 3.5 in Political Science courses and 3.3 overall to qualify for admission to Phase II.

Before enrolling for any graduate-level course work, the student must be formally admitted to the School of Graduate Studies (Phase II of IGS).  Therefore, it is mandatory that application to Phase II occur during the second semester of the junior year, specifically no later than April 1 or November 1 (for graduate status to begin the following semester).  If admitted to the M.A. program, the student will take, or begin to take, 30 hours of graduate-level Political Science courses during the senior year, adhering to all departmental regulations governing the Master’s degree program; and if completed successfully with maintenance of academic standing as pertains to both the B.A. and M.A. programs, these hours will count simultaneously toward both degrees in Political Science.  The B.A. will be awarded upon completion of all requirements for that degree, including total hours; the M.A. will be awarded upon successful completion of the 30 hours of graduate-level Political Science courses and the M.A. Examination or Thesis.

For additional information on application procedures and program requirements, make an appointment to see Professor Pete Moore  (Mather House 219, 368-5265, e-mail: pete.moore@case.edu).

All courses are offered for 3 credit hours unless otherwise noted. 

Course Number Course Name  Days/Times  Faculty
POSC 109 The U.S. Political System  MWF 11:40-12:30 Justin Buchler
POSC 160 Introduction to Comparative Politics (Counts for CAS Global and Cultural Diversity Requirement) TR 10:00-11:15 Kelly McMann
POSC 172 Introduction to International Relations MWF 10:30-11:25 TR 1:00-2:15 Paul Schroeder                                  Elliot Posner
POSC 308/408 The American Presidency MWF 9:30-10:20 Joseph White
POSC 325/425 American Constitutional Law TR 4:30-5:45 Laura Tartakoff
POSC 343/443 Public Opinion MWF 2:15-3:05 Justin Buchler
POSC 346/446 Women and Politics MW 12:45-2:00 Karen Beckwith
POSC 349/449 Research Methods  TR 11:30-12:45 Kelly McMann
POSC 370A/470A Political Economy TR 10:00-11:15 Elliot Posner
POSC 370D/470D Politics of China MWF 11:40-12:30 Paul Schroeder
POSC 370J/470J International Law and Organizations TR 1:00-2:15 Kathryn Lavelle
POSC 371/471 Natural Resources and World Politics MW 12:45-2:00 Pete Moore
POSC 376/476 United States Foreign Policy TR 11:30-12:45 Kathryn Lavelle
POSC 379/479 Introduction to Middle East Politics MW 4:50-6:05 Pete Moore
POSC 395 Special Projects (1-6 credit hours. Prerequisites: see description) Times as arranged Staff
POSC 396 Senior Project/SAGES Capstone (Prerequisites: See description) Times as arranged Staff
POSC 495 Independent Study  (Graduate students only. Must be taken for a letter grade. Prerequisites: See description) Times as arranged Staff
POSC 601 Individual Investigation  (1-6 credit hours. Graduate students only. May be taken only on a pass/fail basis. Prerequisites: See description) Times as arranged Staff
POSC 651 M.A. Thesis Research  (6 credit hours. Graduate students only. Permission from supervisor and graduate committee is required. Grade is for the thesis itself, so Satisfactory or Unsatisfactory) Times as arranged Staff
POSC 701 Dissertation Ph.D.  (1-9 credit hours. Prerequisites: see description) Times as arranged Staff
Integrated Graduate Studies (See description)

POSC 109
The U.S. Political System                                                                                      

Justin Buchler
MWF 11:40-12:30

The U.S. political system was created to bring cooperation, the ability to work together for public ends, out of conflict, the disagreements about ends and means that were common in 1787 and at least as common now. That is the fundamental task of government, and how well that works depends on how much people disagree (beliefs) the rules of the game (how political authority is exercised), and the policy environment (the severity of problems, such as economic conditions or security threats). For this class the basic questions involve what Americans fight about through politics, how decisions are made, whether decisions tend to favor some groups of people over others, and whether decisions can be made at all.

With those questions in mind we will survey the basic institutions and dynamics of the U.S. political system. These include public and elite attitudes and why they matter; how attitudes are mobilized to influence the government, through political parties, interest groups and the media; the separated institutions that share powers to make governmental decisions, such as Congress, the presidency, courts and government agencies: and the elections which link mobilized attitudes to who holds office in the government.

POSC 160
Introduction to Comparative Politics                                                                      

Kelly McMann
TR 10:00-11:15

Comparative politics is the study of processes and institutions within countries.  Prompted by real-world puzzles, comparativists investigate broad, theoretical questions:  What constitutes a revolution, and why do revolutions occur?  How does one country become more democratic than another?  Why do relations between some ethnic groups turn violent?  This course introduces some of the central puzzles and theories of comparative politics in order to help students better understand world events. Counts for CAS Global and Cultural Diversity Requirement.

POSC 172
Introduction to International Relations
Paul Schroeder
MWF 10:30-11:25                                  

Elliot Posner
TR 1:00-2:15

This course is a survey of international relations.  It will address the major questions about the ways that states interact: what is anarchy, and what are its consequences?  Can we mitigate its effects, and if so how?  Has globalization—the increasing flows of goods, people and knowledge across borders—changed the nature of the way states relate to each other?  Has the rise of non-state actors diminished the authority of the state?  This course will take up these large questions by examining the nature of anarchy and sovereignty and their effects in world politics.  It will also ask under what conditions can international cooperation—through treaties, laws and less formal arrangements—help provide peace, security and prosperity.  The course will cover the fundaments of the discipline, including a review of the theoretical approaches and major questions in contemporary international relations.  We will also look at specific issues in contemporary world politics such as human rights, environmental protection and other issues decided upon by the class.

POSC 308/408
The American Presidency
Joseph White
MWF 9:30-10:20

The sources of, strategies of, and restraints on presidential leadership in the United States. Emphasis on problems of policy formation, presidential relations with Congress and executive agencies, and the electoral process.

POSC 325/425
American Constitutional Law
Laura Tartakoff
TR 4:30-5:45

An introductory survey of U.S. constitutional law. Special attention given to the historical, philosophical, and political dimensions of landmark Supreme Court cases. Judicial review, federalism, separation of powers, due process, and equal protection. Supreme Court’s involvement in major political controversies: the New Deal, abortion, physician-assisted suicide, school desegregation, and affirmative action.

POSC 343/443
Public Opinion
Justin Buchler
MWF 2:15-3:05

Examination of theories, concepts and empirical research related to attitudes and the political behavior of mass publics.

POSC 346/446
Women and Politics
Karen Beckwith
MW 12:45-2:00

Women and Politics involves a critical examination of the impact of gender on the forms and distributions of power and politics, with primary reference to the experience of women in the United States. Major concerns of the course include what we mean by “sex,” “gender,” and “politics”; the relationship between women and the state; how women organize collectively to influence state policies; and how the state facilitates and constrains women’s access to and exercise of political power. The course is organized around four foci central to the study of women and politics. The first section of the course focuses on what we mean by “women,” “gender,” and “politics.” In this section, we will consider how these concepts intersect and the ways in which each may be used to deepen our understanding of the workings of governments and political systems, and of women’s relative political powerlessness. The second section of the course employs these concepts to understand the (re) emergence of the US feminist movement, its meanings, practices, and goals, and its transformation across US political history. In the third section, we turn to conventional electoral politics, focusing on women’s candidacies, their campaigns, and women’s voting behavior. In the final section of the course, we consider those general factors that might provide for increased gender equality and improved life status for women, in global, comparative perspective. SAGES departmental seminar.

POSC 349/449
Research Methods
Kelly McMann
TR 11:30-12:45

This course examines approaches that political scientists use to understand events and processes. In doing so, the course provides students with skills helpful to completing senior projects, such as the ability to evaluate and conduct research. Through exercises and projects, students will take part in the research process from constructing a question to developing a research design to interpreting results. Students will learn and apply key techniques, including inductive and deductive reasoning, hypothesis construction, operationalization of concepts, measurements, sampling and probability, causal inference, and the logic of controls. They will produce materials common to the discipline, such as research designs. SAGES departmental seminar.

POSC 370A/470A
Political Economy
Elliot Posner
TR 10:00-11:15

Focus on debates concerning the proper relationship between political and economic systems, including conservative, liberal, and radical perspectives. The politics of international economics and the economics of international politics receive separate attention. The course concludes with study of “modern” political economy and the application of economic theory to the study of political systems.

POSC 370D/470D
Politics of China
Paul Schroeder
MWF 11:40-12:30 pm

Now more than ever, the Chinese state and society are facing tremendous economic, social, and political challenges. This course presents an overview of current issues facing the People’s Republic, including a changing (or not) political culture, policy processes and outcomes at the national and local levels, reform and economic growth, the resultant societal changes and pressures, and the consequent challenges the Communist Party faces as demand for political reform grows. The class involves a mixture of lectures and discussion and draws on a combination of primary and secondary sources, including current news reports and films.

POSC 370J/470J
International Law and Organizations
Kathryn Lavelle
TR 1:00-2:15

Study of international organizations and international law as two means for regulating and coordinating nation-state behavior. History of the two techniques will be traced, covering 19th century efforts at cooperation, the League of Nations and the United Nations, regional and specialized global organization. The functions of international law in global politics will be stressed, with primary focus on the evolving role of law in dealing with global problems, e.g., war, the environment, economic cooperation, and human rights.

POSC 371/471
Natrual Resources and World Politics
Pete Moore
MW 12:45-2:00

Examination of the political causes and ramifications of the uneven distribution of the valuable natural resources for modern industrial societies. Strategic and military issues and the exploitation of the sea bed. Examination in some detail of selected commodity issues, including petroleum, copper and uranium.

POSC 376/476
United States Foreign Policy
Kathryn Lavelle
TR 11:30-12:45

Focus on U.S. foreign policy making with a dynamic network of executive and congressional actors and organizations; analysis of traditional and contemporary U.S. foreign policies from nuclear defense to current economic resource issues; future role of the United States in world affairs.

POSC 379/479
Introduction to Middle East Politics
Pete Moore
MW 4:50-6:05

This is an introductory course about Middle East Politics, in regional as well as international aspects. In this course we will explore broad social, economic, and political themes that have defined the region since the end of World War Two. Since this is an introductory course, a major goal will be to gain comparative knowledge about the region’s states and peoples. The countries that comprise the modern Middle East are quite diverse; therefore, we will only be able to focus on a few cases in depth. A second goal is to use the tools and theories social scientists employ to answer broad questions related to the region, such as: How have colonial legacies shaped political and economic development in the Middle East? How do oil, religion, and identity interact with politics? How have external powers affected the region’s political development? What do the uprisings of 2011 hold for the region’s future?

POSC 395
Special Projects

(Requires consent and a permit from instructor)  Study of a topic of particular interest, or an approved internship. The student must submit to the departmental office a project prospectus form, approved and signed by the faculty supervisor, no later than the end of the second week of classes. The prospectus must outline the goals of the project and the research methodology to be used and is part of the basis for grading. The prospectus form is available from the departmental office of from the department’s Web page.

POSC 396
Senior Project SAGES Capstone
Times as Arranged

(Requires consent and a permit from instructor)  Capstone experience for political science majors or senior POSC minors as part of the SAGES program, providing opportunity to do an in-depth paper on a topic of particular interest to them. Students must obtain approval from a faculty project advisor and list that advisor on the registration form. The advisor must sign and student submit to the department a prospectus including goals, schedule, and research methodology. This paper should demonstrate, and ideally even extend, the skills and expertise developed over the course of study in the department. Upon completion of the capstone, students will be expected to present their work in a public forum. Recommended preparation: Junior or Senior political science major or senior political science minor and departmental prospectus form. Counts as SAGES Senior Capstone.

POSC 495
Independent Study
Staff
Times as Arranged

(Requires consent and a permit from instructor)  Independent study on particular topics that are not covered by individual graduate courses or are not available in a timely manner for the student’s needs.  In order to receive a permit, the student must complete a prospectus form, approved and signed by the faculty project supervisor and the student.  The prospectus must outline the material to be covered and the basis for grading of the course, and a copy of the form will be filed with the Department Office.  POSC 495 is designed especially for reading courses but can be used for other purposes as well.  Note that this course will result in a letter grade.  Graduate students wanting to take independent study on a pass/fail basis should speak with their project supervisors about registering for POSC 601, “Individual Investigation.”

POSC 601
Individual Investigation
Staff
Times as Arranged

(Requires consent and a permit from instructor)  POSC 601 permits a graduate student to do an in-depth study of a topic of particular interest for which no regular course is available.  It should be particularly helpful in preparing for field exams.  Students must develop their course of study with a supervising professor, who will set requirements for written work.

Credit (1-6 hours) and times as arranged.  Note that this course may be taken only on a pass/fail basis.  Graduate students who wish to do a project for a letter grade should speak with their supervising professors about registering for POSC 495, “Independent Study.”

IMPORTANT:  In order to obtain a permit, the student must complete a POSC 601 project prospectus form, signed by the faculty project advisor and the student, which will form the basis of a “contract” of expectations for the project.  The prospectus form, available in the Department Office (Mather House 111), will outline the goals of the project and the research methodology to be used and thus will be part of the basis for grading.  A copy of this completed and signed form will be filed with the Department Office.

POSC 651
M.A. Thesis Research
Staff
Times as Arranged

Independent study of a research question and completion of a major paper under advisor supervision. The School of Graduate Study requires 6 credit hours be completed.  The thesis will be reviewed by the advisor and a departmental committee.

POSC 701
Dissertation Ph.D.
Staff
Times as Arranged

(Requires consent and a permit from instructor)  Credit (1-9 hours) and times as arranged.  However, Graduate School regulations specify that a student must register for a minimum of 3 hours of 701 per semester until 18 hours of 701 credit have been completed.  After having earned 18 hours of 701, a candidate may be permitted to register for less than 3 hours per semester, but only with the prior approval of his/her dissertation advisor and only for a maximum of four semesters.  Thereafter, the student must resume registering for a minimum of 3 hours of 701 credit per semester until the dissertation is completed and defended.  See the Political Science Graduate Brochure or your POSC dissertation advisor for complete details on eligibility to register for 701.

Integrated Graduate Studies (IGS)
Special Program

It is possible for a qualified student to obtain an M.A. in Political Science simultaneously with, or shortly after, completion of the baccalaureate program.  If by the end of the senior year the student has completed successfully 90 undergraduate hours, 30 graduate hours (for a total of 120 hours), and the Political Science M.A. Examination, that student can receive both the Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees within the four undergraduate years.

Admission to the Political Science IGS program is competitive, and only a limited number of students are accepted in any academic year.  Admission is determined by fulfillment of specific requirements (see below), and by the Department’s estimate of the student’s potential for advanced study and independent work.

Phase I of IGS alerts the Department and the School of Graduate Studies to your interest in the program and allows the monitoring of your junior year for fulfillment of the undergraduate prerequisites to graduate study.  Application to Phase I must occur no later than second week of classes at the beginning of the junior year, but preferably earlier.  To qualify for Phase I, the student must have completed 54 hours of undergraduate work and must have minimum grade point averages of 3.7 in Political Science courses and 3.3 overall.

During Phase I, the student must complete 90 undergraduate hours (ordinarily by the end of the junior year) and must have satisfied all general requirements for the B.A., including at least 21 hours in the Political Science major, the Arts and Sciences Core Curriculum, and one minor program.  Included in the 21 Political Science hours must be one course each in American, Comparative, and International politics taken at CWRU.  Also, the student must maintain minimum GPAs of 3.5 in Political Science courses and 3.3 overall to qualify for admission to Phase II.

Before enrolling for any graduate-level course work, the student must be formally admitted to the School of Graduate Studies (Phase II of IGS).  Therefore, it is mandatory that application to Phase II occur during the second semester of the junior year, specifically no later than April 1 or November 1 (for graduate status to begin the following semester).  If admitted to the M.A. program, the student will take, or begin to take, 30 hours of graduate-level Political Science courses during the senior year, adhering to all departmental regulations governing the Master’s degree program; and if completed successfully with maintenance of academic standing as pertains to both the B.A. and M.A. programs, these hours will count simultaneously toward both degrees in Political Science.  The B.A. will be awarded upon completion of all requirements for that degree, including total hours; the M.A. will be awarded upon successful completion of the 30 hours of graduate-level Political Science courses and the M.A. Examination or Thesis.

For additional information on application procedures and program requirements, make an appointment to see Professor Pete Moore  (Mather House 219, 368-5265, e-mail: pete.moore@case.edu).

All courses are offered for 3 credit hours unless otherwise noted. 

Course Number Course Name  Days/Times  Faculty
POSC 109 The U.S. Political System  TR 2:45-4:00 Joseph White
POSC 160 Introduction to Comparative Politics (Counts for CAS Global and Cultural Diversity Requirement) MW 12:30-1:45 Pete Moore
POSC 172 Introduction to International Relations MW 3:00-4:15 Elliot Posner
POSC 301/401 Decision-Making in American Cities W 4:30-7:00 Michael Wager
POSC 310/410 Congress in an Era of Polarization MWF 2:00-2:50 Justin Buchler
POSC 326/426 Constitutions in Practical Politics TR 1:15-2:30 Laura Tartakoff
POSC 341/441 Elections, Voters, and Political Parties MW 12:30-1:45 Karen Beckwith
POSC 353/453 Political Thought and Political Change in China  TR 2:45-4:00 Paul Schroeder
POSC 364/464 Dictatorship and Democracy in Modern Latin America TR 4:30-5:45 Laura Tartakoff
POSC 367/467 Western European Political Systems TR 11:30-12:45 Karl Kaltenthaler
POSC 370C/470C The United States and Asia TR 10:00-11:15 Paul Schroeder
POSC 375/475 The International Politics of Technology MW 9:00-10:15 Elliot Posner
POSC 380A State and War in Africa and the Middle East MW 3:00-4:15 Pete Moore
POSC 383/483  Health Care Policy and Politics in the U.S. TR 10:00-11:15 Joseph White
POSC 395 Special Projects (1-6 credit hours. Prerequisites: see description) Times as arranged Staff
POSC 396 Senior Project/SAGES Capstone (Prerequisites: See description) Times as arranged Staff
POSC 495 Independent Study  (Graduate students only. Must be taken for a letter grade. Prerequisites: See description) Times as arranged Staff
POSC 601 Individual Investigation  (1-6 credit hours. Graduate students only. May be taken only on a pass/fail basis. Prerequisites: See description) Times as arranged Staff
POSC 651 M.A. Thesis Research  (6 credit hours. Graduate students only. Permission from supervisor and graduate committee is required. Grade is for the thesis itself, so Satisfactory or Unsatisfactory) Times as arranged Staff
POSC 701 Dissertation Ph.D.  (1-9 credit hours. Prerequisites: see description) Times as arranged Staff
Washington Center Program (See description)
Integrated Graduate Studies (See description)

POSC 109
The U.S. Political System                                                                                      
Joseph White
TR 2:45-4:00 

The U.S. political system was created to bring cooperation, the ability to work together for public ends, out of conflict, the disagreements about ends and means that were common in 1787 and at least as common now. That is the fundamental task of government, and how well that works depends on how much people disagree (beliefs) the rules of the game (how political authority is exercised), and the policy environment (the severity of problems, such as economic conditions or security threats). For this class the basic questions involve what Americans fight about through politics, how decisions are made, whether decisions tend to favor some groups of people over others, and whether decisions can be made at all.

With those questions in mind we will survey the basic institutions and dynamics of the U.S. political system. These include public and elite attitudes and why they matter; how attitudes are mobilized to influence the government, through political parties, interest groups and the media; the separated institutions that share powers to make governmental decisions, such as Congress, the presidency, courts and government agencies: and the elections which link mobilized attitudes to who holds office in the government.

POSC 160
Introduction to Comparative Politics                                                                      
Pete Moore
MW 12:30-1:45 

Comparative politics is the study of processes and institutions within countries.  Prompted by real-world puzzles, comparativists investigate broad, theoretical questions:  What constitutes a revolution, and why do revolutions occur?  How does one country become more democratic than another?  Why do relations between some ethnic groups turn violent?  This course introduces some of the central puzzles and theories of comparative politics in order to help students better understand world events. Counts for CAS Global and Cultural Diversity Requirement.

POSC 172
Introduction to International Relations                                      
Elliot Posner
MW 3:00-4:15

This course is a survey of international relations.  It will address the major questions about the ways that states interact: what is anarchy, and what are its consequences?  Can we mitigate its effects, and if so how?  Has globalization—the increasing flows of goods, people and knowledge across borders—changed the nature of the way states relate to each other?  Has the rise of non-state actors diminished the authority of the state?  This course will take up these large questions by examining the nature of anarchy and sovereignty and their effects in world politics.  It will also ask under what conditions can international cooperation—through treaties, laws and less formal arrangements—help provide peace, security and prosperity.  The course will cover the fundaments of the discipline, including a review of the theoretical approaches and major questions in contemporary international relations.  We will also look at specific issues in contemporary world politics such as human rights, environmental protection and other issues decided upon by the class.

POSC 301/401
Decision Making in American Cities
Michael Wager
W 4:30-7:00

To fully understand government and politics in the United States, we need to understand the role and functions of local governments.  This course will explore the rich history and current state of local governments. The course will show how these governments are organized and function, how they receive and spend their funds, what their responsibilities are, how they interface with other local governments as well as state and federal governments.  The course will also look at how local governments work with business, institutions, and the public at large. It will also look at how such issues as technology, national politics, economics, demographics, climate and other factors impacted local governments over time.

These governments (including cities, villages, townships, counties, special districts, among others) provide public services that affect our lives on a daily basis.  Such services requires decision-making on a myriad of tasks such as public safety, street maintenance, transportation,  trash pick-up, public health, economic development, education, recreation, planning, zoning, and many more.  Elected and appointed officials make decisions based on legal precedent, political goals, economic realities, and other factors.  The public at large makes decisions through participation in civic life, voting, and basic citizenship.

Because such issues are always in the news, students will discuss and analyze key events of the day as part of every class and attend a public decision-making meeting. With a presidential election in 2016, the class will explore the urban policies proposed by the candidates.

POSC 310/410
Congress in an Era of Polarization
Justin Buchler
MWF 2:00-2:50

A study of Congress in the modern era with emphasis on the development of polarization, procedural changes, conflict between the legislative and executive branches during divided government, and the current state of representation.

 

POSC 326/426
Constitutions in Practical Politics
Laura Tartakoff
TR 1:15-2:30

“Constitutions in Practical Politics” examines the practical role played by constitutions in ancient, modern, and contemporary politics. First, it explores the impact of constitutional order in Periclean Athens, republican Rome, and medieval Europe, and also in the Republic of Venice and the Dutch Republic. Then, after contrasting the constitutionalist visions of the English, American, and French Revolutions, the course turns to contemporary constitutional experiences in Hungary.

POSC 341/441
Elections, Voters, and Political Parties
Karen Beckwith
MW 12:30-1:45

This course examines US political parties, elections and voting behavior, with particular attention to the 2012 presidential and congressional elections.  Topics include party organization and structure; candidate recruitment, nomination rules and procedures; and the parties’ strategic interaction within the context of election law and campaign finance law.  The course investigates the distribution of and changes in party identification and voter turnout; and addresses current topical issues, such as “voter suppression,” “voter fraud,” changing voter demographics, and partisan polarization within and between the two major political parties.

POSC 353/453
Political Thought and Political Change in China
Paul Schroeder
TR 2:45-4:00

“No state is forever strong or forever weak,” said Han Feizi, China’s great legalist philosopher. He believed that as a country’s conditions changed, the laws and institutions had to change to meet these new circumstances. China today faces new circumstances that have caused deep and broad challenges to its people. This has prompted serious debate among intellectuals, leaders, and average citizens about the possibility for and direction of political reform. Indeed, China’s leadership is focusing anew on Confucius is an effort to look for a reform model to follow.  But what might that reform look like, and how would it be conceived, if it could overcome current barriers? This seminar will provide a fuller understanding of China’s potential for political change by examining Chinese political thought from Confucius, Lao Tzu, and Han Feizi through Mao Zedong and Deng Xiaoping. These and other political philosophies have influenced China’s political culture, which will influence the form of any change.

 

POSC 364/464
Dictatorship and Democracy in Modern Latin America
Laura Tartakoff
TR 4:30-5:45

This course focuses on political leadership in 20th century Latin America, exploring the nature, causes, and consequences of dictatorship and democracy in the region. Case studies in dictatorship will highlight Rafael Trujillo, the Somozas, Juan Perón, Fidel Castro, and Augusto Pinochet.

Chile’s transition to democracy will introduce key factors in the process of democratization. Costa Rica’s José Figueres, Venezuela’s Rómulo Betancourt, and Puerto Rico’s Luis Muñoz Marín will serve as case studies in democracy. The class will contrasting the records of current presidents Nicolás Maduro and Michelle Bachelet.

POSC 367/467
Western European Political Systems
Karl Kaltenthaler
TR 11:30-12:45

Comparative analysis of sociopolitical systems of selected Western European industrial democracies, using North American systems as a point of comparison.

POSC 370C/470C
The United States and Asia
Paul Schroeder
TR 10:00-11:15

Survey and analysis of U.S.-Asia relations in the post-World War II period. The course focus is specifically on the interaction of politics and economics in the United States’ relations with Japan, China, and North and South Korea.  Topics will include the role of Asia in U.S. Cold War policies, the dynamics of U.S.-Japan and U.S.-Korean alliance politics, post-Cold War issues involving U.S. foreign policy toward Asia, a history and analysis of economic conflict cooperation, and an examination of the move toward Asia-Pacific “regionalism.”

POSC 375/475
The International Politics of Technology
Elliot Posner
MW 9:00-10:15

Technology is deeply political.  Nowhere is this statement more evident than in the realm of international relations, where governments perceive technology as a source of power and wealth and a symbol of relative position and modernity.  Yet for centuries skeptics have questioned the economic rationale of government technology policies.  Still, to this day, countries support emulation, innovation and a host of other strategies as means for catching up with leading nations or locking in current advantages.  What lies behind such policies?  What do they accomplish?  And what are the domestic and international politics surrounding them? After reading classic arguments, including texts by Adam Smith, Alexander Hamilton and Friedrich List, students will consider 20th and 21st century debates and an array of experiments tried by poor, middle-income and rich countries.  Cases include the development of new industries; the imposition of sanctions; the dilemma of dual technologies and military spillovers; the forging of national champions; the reorganization of banks and the creation of international financial centers; the copying of regional clusters (e.g. Silicon Valley) and stock markets (e.g. the Nasdaq); and the extraterritorial extension of domestic regulation and governance techniques.  There are no prerequisites.

POSC 380A
State and War in Africa and the Middle East
Pete Moore
MW 3:00-4:15

The Middle East, North Africa, and Sub-Saharan Africa remain the most volatile and conflict prone regions of the world. Traditional approaches to war and state conflict have emphasized systemic variables, such as balance of power, military capabilities, perceptions, the security dilemma, and of course anarchy. While these concepts have generated much academic interest, their ability to explain and understand conflict in the developing world is severely limited. This is due to the basic fact that nearly all conflict in the world today is not between states but is taking place within state boundaries. What drives these conflicts? Are there common factors and patterns within the Middle East and Africa? How does sub-state conflict affect political and economic development? What are the most likely resolution strategies? Recommended preparation: POSC 379. Counts as SAGES Departmental Seminar.

POSC 383/483
Health Policy and Politics in the United States
Joseph White
TR 10:00-11:15

The debates about “Obamacare” reveal deep divisions in the United States about the role of government in the health care system. Yet governments are deeply involved in many ways, ranging from local public health regulation, to states licensing medical professionals, to the federal government’s funding of research and both federal and state health insurance programs.  Health care is at least a sixth of the national economy, a far larger share than in any other country.  Ironically, the United States both funds a smaller share of health care through public programs than in any other rich democracy and, because the system is so expensive, spends a larger share of its economy on public finance of health care than in all but a few other countries. What explains government’s roles in U.S. health care? Any answers must address both the peculiarities of the health care field and the dynamics of U.S. politics. So this course will provide an introduction to health policy issues and the health policy community, and an analysis of the politics of policy conflict.

POSC 395
Special Projects
Times as Arranged

(Requires consent and a permit from instructor)  Study of a topic of particular interest, or an approved internship. The student must submit to the departmental office a project prospectus form, approved and signed by the faculty supervisor, no later than the end of the second week of classes. The prospectus must outline the goals of the project and the research methodology to be used and is part of the basis for grading. The prospectus form is available from the departmental office of from the department’s Web page.

POSC 396
Senior Project SAGES Capstone
Times as Arranged

(Requires consent and a permit from instructor)  Capstone experience for political science majors or senior POSC minors as part of the SAGES program, providing opportunity to do an in-depth paper on a topic of particular interest to them. Students must obtain approval from a faculty project advisor and list that advisor on the registration form. The advisor must sign and student submit to the department a prospectus including goals, schedule, and research methodology. This paper should demonstrate, and ideally even extend, the skills and expertise developed over the course of study in the department. Upon completion of the capstone, students will be expected to present their work in a public forum. Recommended preparation: Junior or Senior political science major or senior political science minor and departmental prospectus form. Counts as SAGES Senior Capstone.

POSC 495    
Independent Study
Staff
Times as Arranged

(Requires consent and a permit from instructor)  Independent study on particular topics that are not covered by individual graduate courses or are not available in a timely manner for the student’s needs.  In order to receive a permit, the student must complete a prospectus form, approved and signed by the faculty project supervisor and the student.  The prospectus must outline the material to be covered and the basis for grading of the course, and a copy of the form will be filed with the Department Office.  POSC 495 is designed especially for reading courses but can be used for other purposes as well.  Note that this course will result in a letter grade.  Graduate students wanting to take independent study on a pass/fail basis should speak with their project supervisors about registering for POSC 601, “Individual Investigation.”

POSC 601
Individual Investigation
Staff
Times as Arranged

(Requires consent and a permit from instructor)  POSC 601 permits a graduate student to do an in-depth study of a topic of particular interest for which no regular course is available.  It should be particularly helpful in preparing for field exams.  Students must develop their course of study with a supervising professor, who will set requirements for written work.

Credit (1-6 hours) and times as arranged.  Note that this course may be taken only on a pass/fail basis.  Graduate students who wish to do a project for a letter grade should speak with their supervising professors about registering for POSC 495, “Independent Study.”

IMPORTANT:  In order to obtain a permit, the student must complete a POSC 601 project prospectus form, signed by the faculty project advisor and the student, which will form the basis of a “contract” of expectations for the project.  The prospectus form, available in the Department Office (Mather House 111), will outline the goals of the project and the research methodology to be used and thus will be part of the basis for grading.  A copy of this completed and signed form will be filed with the Department Office.

POSC 651
M.A. Thesis Research
Staff
Times as Arranged

Independent study of a research question and completion of a major paper under advisor supervision. The School of Graduate Study requires 6 credit hours be completed.  The thesis will be reviewed by the advisor and a departmental committee.

POSC 701
Dissertation Ph.D. 
Staff
Times as Arranged

(Requires consent and a permit from instructor)  Credit (1-9 hours) and times as arranged.  However, Graduate School regulations specify that a student must register for a minimum of 3 hours of 701 per semester until 18 hours of 701 credit have been completed.  After having earned 18 hours of 701, a candidate may be permitted to register for less than 3 hours per semester, but only with the prior approval of his/her dissertation advisor and only for a maximum of four semesters.  Thereafter, the student must resume registering for a minimum of 3 hours of 701 credit per semester until the dissertation is completed and defended.  See the Political Science Graduate Brochure or your POSC dissertation advisor for complete details on eligibility to register for 701.

All courses are offered for 3 credit hours unless otherwise noted. 

Course Number Course Name  Days/Times  Faculty
POSC 109 The U.S. Political System  MWF 10:30-11:20 Joseph White
POSC 160 Introduction to Comparative Politics (Counts for CAS Global and Cultural Diversity Requirement) TR 11:30-12:45 Kelly McMann
POSC 172, Section 100 Introduction to International Relations TR 2:45-4:00 Kathryn Lavelle
POSC 172, Section 101 Introduction to International Relations TR 10:00-11:15 Staff
POSC 306/406 Interest Groups in the Policy Process MWF 3:00-3:50 Joseph White
POSC 328/428 Topics in Civil Liberties TR 4:30-5:45 Laura Tartakoff
POSC 348 History of Modern Political and Social Thought M 4:30-7 Miriam Levin
POSC 349/449 Political Science Research Methods  (Limit 17. Counts as SAGES Departmental Seminar) MWF 2:00-2:50 Justin Buchler
POSC 360/460 Revolts and Revolutions in Global Perspective MW 12:30-1:45 Pete Moore
POSC 363/463 Comparative Analysis of Elections and Electoral Systems (Limit 17. SAGES Departmental Seminar) MW 12:30-1:45 Karen Beckwith
POSC 370F/470F Financial Politics in the U.S. and the World TR 10:00-11:15 Kathryn Lavelle
POSC 370H/470H China’s Foreign Policy (Counts for CAS Global and Cultural Diversity Requirement) TR 1:15-2:30 Staff
POSC 373/473 Politics of the European Union TR 11:30-12:45 Elliot Posner
POSC 379/479 Introduction to Middle East Politics (Counts for CAS Global and Cultural Diversity Requirement) MW 3:00-4:15 Pete Moore
POSC 382A Child Policy MW 3:00-4:15 Gabriella Celeste
POSC 384/484 Ethics and Public Policy T 4:30-7:00 Jeremy Bendik-Keymer
POSC 395 Special Projects (1-6 credit hours. Prerequisites: see description) Times as arranged Staff
POSC 396 Senior Project/SAGES Capstone (Prerequisites: See description) Times as arranged Staff
POSC 495 Independent Study  (Graduate students only. Must be taken for a letter grade. Prerequisites: See description) Times as arranged Staff
POSC 601 Individual Investigation  (1-6 credit hours. Graduate students only. May be taken only on a pass/fail basis. Prerequisites: See description) Times as arranged Staff
POSC 651 M.A. Thesis Research  (6 credit hours. Graduate students only. Permission from supervisor and graduate committee is required. Grade is for the thesis itself, so Satisfactory or Unsatisfactory) Times as arranged Staff
POSC 701 Dissertation Ph.D.  (1-9 credit hours. Prerequisites: see description) Times as arranged Staff
Washington Center Program (See description)
Integrated Graduate Studies (See description)

 

POSC 109
The U.S. Political System                                                                                      
Joseph White
MWF 10:30-11:20  

The U.S. political system was created to bring cooperation, the ability to work together for public ends, out of conflict, the disagreements about ends and means that were common in 1787 and at least as common now. That is the fundamental task of government, and how well that works depends on how much people disagree (beliefs) the rules of the game (how political authority is exercised), and the policy environment (the severity of problems, such as economic conditions or security threats). For this class the basic questions involve what Americans fight about through politics, how decisions are made, whether decisions tend to favor some groups of people over others, and whether decisions can be made at all.

With those questions in mind we will survey the basic institutions and dynamics of the U.S. political system. These include public and elite attitudes and why they matter; how attitudes are mobilized to influence the government, through political parties, interest groups and the media; the separated institutions that share powers to make governmental decisions, such as Congress, the presidency, courts and government agencies: and the elections which link mobilized attitudes to who holds office in the government.

 

POSC 160
Introduction to Comparative Politics                                                                      
Kelly McMann
TR 11:30-12:45   

Comparative politics is the study of processes and institutions within countries.  Prompted by real-world puzzles, comparativists investigate broad, theoretical questions:  What constitutes a revolution, and why do revolutions occur?  How does one country become more democratic than another?  Why do relations between some ethnic groups turn violent?  This course introduces some of the central puzzles and theories of comparative politics in order to help students better understand world events. Counts for CAS Global and Cultural Diversity Requirement.

 

POSC 172
Introduction to International Relations                                                                    
Kathryn Lavelle
TR 2:45-4:00

This course is a survey of international relations.  It will address the major questions about the ways that states interact: what is anarchy, and what are its consequences?  Can we mitigate its effects, and if so how?  Has globalization—the increasing flows of goods, people and knowledge across borders—changed the nature of the way states relate to each other?  Has the rise of non-state actors diminished the authority of the state?  This course will take up these large questions by examining the nature of anarchy and sovereignty and their effects in world politics.  It will also ask under what conditions can international cooperation—through treaties, laws and less formal arrangements—help provide peace, security and prosperity.  The course will cover the fundaments of the discipline, including a review of the theoretical approaches and major questions in contemporary international relations.  We will also look at specific issues in contemporary world politics such as human rights, environmental protection and other issues decided upon by the class.

 

POSC 172
Introduction to International Relations                                                                    

Staff
TR 10:00-11:15

Why do countries fight wars? Can nuclear proliferation be curtailed? Does trade help developing countries or harm them? This survey of the field of International Relations examines “big questions” in world politics. It introduces themes including the rise, development and changes of the nation-state system; patterns and causes of international conflict and cooperation; international law, organizations, and transnational institutions; the roles of both state and non-state actors in international politics; and the methods used to understand this field.

 

POSC 306/406       
Interest Groups in the Policy Process
Joseph White   
MWF 3:00-3:50   

This course is about how interests, variously defined, deal with government(s) in the United States. Most interests are not “groups” organized for political purposes but ongoing organizations, such as corporations and unions. Much advocacy for interests is not about big policy issues but the maintenance of organizations – such as zoning variances, or defense contracts. A great deal of government relations work involves figuring out how government action could affect an organization, instead of trying to change government policy. Yet at the same time, much of what government does is shaped by how organized interests work to influence decisions. We will study the interaction of interests and government from three main perspectives. First we view, as any advocate must, “the government” not as one organization but as a series of arenas for decision-making: local, state and national governments; legislators and courts and executives and elections. Second, we consider decision making as a process with particular phases, such as setting an agenda, generating alternatives, passing legislation, and then implementing legislation. Third, we will pay special attention to how interests’ different resources may make them better able to have influence in some arenas than at others, or at some phases of the policy process than at others. Rather than asking big questions about “democracy” or whether interests are “good or bad,” the goal of this course is to help students understand two things. First, if they become part of an organization that deals with the government (which means any organization), how they might choose tactics and strategies. Second, as citizens, to what extent and in what ways does the process of interests dealing with governments favor some people over others?

 

POSC 328/428       
Topics in Civil Liberties
Laura Tartakoff   
TR 4:30-5:45

Justice Frankfurter once noted that the history of liberty has largely been the history of fair criminal procedures. Without such safeguards provided by the rule of law in a pluralist society, criminal prosecution might be used to crush opposition and dissent. Constant fear — the greatest of human evils according to Montesquieu –would reign; the arbitrary power of government would go unchecked. Thus, this course will focus on the U.S. Supreme Court’s interpretation of the rights of the accused as outlined in sections of the Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, and Eighth Amendments. It will cover the following topics: (1) arrests, searches, and seizures, (2) the privilege against compelled self-incrimination, (3) the rights to counsel and jury trial, and (4) capital punishment. Our approach will be case-specific, but special attention will be given to the complex interplay of history, philosophy, and politics in the framing of each topic.

 

POSC 348              
History of Modern Political and Social Thought
Miriam Levin        
M 4:30-7

(Also offered as HSTY 348/448.)  This course explores the responses of philosophers, economic theorists, culture critics, and public policy makers to changes in western society wrought by industrialization by focusing on their concerns with technological change.

 

POSC 349/449       
Political Science Research Methods
Justin Buchler  
MWF 2:00-2:50   

(Limit 17.  Approved SAGES departmental seminar).  This course examines approaches that political scientists use to understand political events and processes in order to develop skills helpful to completing senior projects, primarily evaluating and conducting research.  Through exercises and projects, students will take part in the research process from developing a question to research design to interpretation of results.  Students will learn and apply key techniques, including inductive and deductive reasoning, hypothesis construction, operationalization of concepts, measurement, sampling and probability, causal inference, and the logic of controls.

Rather than a “cookbook” approach, the course will follow the pattern of a research project.  We will use a topic as a common thread to tie materials together in order to demonstrate how the principles you will learn are actually used.  The topic we will use is the influence of campaign contributions on votes cast by Members of Congress.  We will discuss other examples in class that cover a wide variety in order to provide breadth to the course materials.  However, we will keep coming back to the topic of campaign finance in order to keep a common thread so that we don’t lose sight of the big picture.

The course will proceed in three sections.  In the first section, we will discuss the use of formal models in political science to generate hypotheses.  The second section of the course will focus on research design.  The final section of the course will address techniques for data analysis, and will use real campaign finance data to test predictions from the first section of the course.

 

POSC 360/460       
Revolts and Revolutions in Global Perspective
Pete Moore   
MW 12:30-1:45

The Arab protests of 2011 gripped the attention of the world.  Young protestors succeeded in unseating some long time rulers but in other cases tense standoffs have evolved.  This course takes those events as a starting point to examine the broader political history of revolts and revolutions in the global south.  The first part of the course examines some of the classic social science debates about what constitutes revolution, what leads to revolution, and what the effects can be.  The second part of the course analyzes specific cases in Europe, Latin America, Africa, and Asia to understand the causes and consequences of revolt and revolution.  What drives everyday persons to brave the dangers of protest?  When and why do political leaders decide to resist or reform?  What happens when revolts fail?  What happens when they succeed?  Material for the course will include classic social science narratives, revolutionary polemics, popular analyses of events since 2011, examples of social media as political action, and first person narratives.

 

POSC 363/463       
Comparative Analysis of Elections and Electoral Systems
Karen Beckwith    
MW 12:30-1:45

(Limit 17. SAGES Departmental Seminar) Elections involve more than a simple act of voting to express individual preferences. The rules under which worldwide elections are held determine who controls the executive and how votes are converted into legislative seats. The mechanics of various electoral arrangements will be examined in detail and the consequences for the political system discussed in terms of strategies and desired outcomes on the part of contestants. Students will research individual countries and analyze recent elections from both qualitative and quantitative perspectives.

 

POSC 370F/470F    
Financial Politics in the U.S. and the World
Kathryn Lavelle   
TR 10:00-11:15 

This course explores how political institutions make policy in the financial area with particular emphasis on the United States.  Using a bureaucratic politics framework, it examines money, banks and the securities industry by integrating a wide range of literature in economics and political science.  Specific objectives include familiarizing students with different approaches to the political economy of finance from different disciplines, exploring the historical evolution of finance, examining the changing relationship between public and private authority within the financial system, considering how politics operates in a crisis, and evaluating the role of international financial institutions in the global economy.  By taking this course, students will equip themselves for further research into politics and economics, as well as offer them tools to analyze future policy developments as they unfold.

 

POSC 370H/470H
China’s Foreign Policy
Staff
TR 1:15-2:30

The rise of China is evident in the country’s more forward and robust foreign policy that began in 1979. At every turn, nations throughout the world must now consider China wherever their interests are at stake, be it Korea and Northeast Asia, Indochina and Southeast Asia, India/Pakistan and South Asia, or Afghanistan and Iran in the Middle East, not to mention the many African states that welcome Chinese investment but chafe at China’s presence. Further, China is increasingly aggressive in international trade, a major determinant of its foreign policy. This course describes the key factors that make up Chinese foreign policy, including its cultural tradition, policy-making institutions, the role of the military, and domestic determinants of foreign policy. The course also examines China’s ever-changing foreign policy strategies, from an aggressive posture to charming its neighbors only to become more strident once again. The course will also examine China’s role involving possible mercantilism, currency manipulation, and the hunt for traditional and alternative energy sources. Throughout the course, we will pay attention to how China’s foreign policy relates to international relations theories and what strategies might be used to manage China’s growing role in international affairs. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement.

 

POSC 373/473       
Politics of the European Union
Elliot Posner         
TR 11:30-12:45   

The creation of the European Union ranks among the most significant developments in contemporary European and international history.  Yet scholars have disagreed about nearly every important aspect of its origins, nature and implications, and now they argue about how the current banking and sovereign debt crises will affect the euro and the EU itself.  The seminar’s readings, discussions and written assignments will introduce students to the main debates by addressing six questions:  What is the EU? What accounts for its origins and evolution?  How does the EU work and what does it do? What impact has it had on the national societies, polities and economies of Europe?  How does the EU influence relations among members, neighboring countries, global society and international politics and economics?  Finally, how is the sovereign debt crisis evolving and what are the likely consequences for the EU’s future?

 

POSC 379/479       
Introduction to Middle East Politics
Pete Moore}
MW 3:00-4:15

This is an introductory course about Middle East Politics, in regional as well as international aspects.  In this course we will explore broad social, economic, and political themes that have defined the region since the end of World War Two.  Since this is an introductory course, a major goal will be to gain comparative knowledge about the region’s states and peoples.  The countries that comprise the modern Middle East are quite diverse; therefore, we will only be able to focus on a few cases in depth.  A second goal is to use the tools and theories social scientists employ to answer broad questions related to the region, such as:  How have colonial legacies shaped political and economic development in the Middle East?  How do oil, religion, and identity interact with politics?  How have external powers affected the region’s political development?  What do the uprisings of 2011 hold for the region’s future? Counts for CAS Global and Cultural Diversity Requirement.

 

POSC 382A            
Child Policy
Gabriella Celeste  
MW 3:00-4:15  

(Limit 22. Also offered as ANTH 305 and CHST 301) This course introduces students to issues in public policy that impact children and families. Local, state, and federal child policy will be considered, and topics will include, for example, policies related to child poverty, education, child welfare, juvenile justice, and children’s physical and mental health. Students will learn how policy is developed, how research informs policy and vice versa, and a framework for analyzing social policy. Recommended preparation: One social sciences course or consent.

 

POSC 384/484        
Ethics and Public Policy
Jeremy Bendik-Keymer                   
T 4:30-7:00

(Also offered as PHIL 384/484). “Policy” and its cognate words “police,” “polite,” and “politics” have their root in the Greek word polis, which meant, quite simply, city-state.  Policy has historically had a relation to ethics through philosophy via Plato’s Politeia (Republic) –an idealized “policy” whose goal was complete virtue in any citizen.  This was a totalitarian ideal.  But what is policy when it is grounded instead in democracy? We will have to approach policy through the assumption of autonomy –the moral core of democracy.  Autonomy’s problem is power, and the main obstacle to legitimacy is moral invisibility.  In this course, we focus on the dynamics of autonomy, power, and moral invisibility in order to assess existing policy, to explore the conditions under which any policy could be acceptable, and to identify ways in which policies should be changed.  There can be no just policy without keeping open the possibility of politics, understood as a radical challenge to the limits of visibility framed by existing policy. In a democracy, moral invisibility is the basic threat to policy.

POSC 395
Special Projects
Times as Arranged

(Requires consent and a permit from instructor)  Study of a topic of particular interest, or an approved internship. The student must submit to the departmental office a project prospectus form, approved and signed by the faculty supervisor, no later than the end of the second week of classes. The prospectus must outline the goals of the project and the research methodology to be used and is part of the basis for grading. The prospectus form is available from the departmental office of from the department’s Web page.

 

POSC 396
Senior Project SAGES Capstone
Times as Arranged

(Requires consent and a permit from instructor)  Capstone experience for political science majors or senior POSC minors as part of the SAGES program, providing opportunity to do an in-depth paper on a topic of particular interest to them. Students must obtain approval from a faculty project advisor and list that advisor on the registration form. The advisor must sign and student submit to the department a prospectus including goals, schedule, and research methodology. This paper should demonstrate, and ideally even extend, the skills and expertise developed over the course of study in the department. Upon completion of the capstone, students will be expected to present their work in a public forum. Recommended preparation: Junior or Senior political science major or senior political science minor and departmental prospectus form. Counts as SAGES Senior Capstone.

 

POSC 495    
Independent Study
Staff
Times as Arranged

(Requires consent and a permit from instructor)  Independent study on particular topics that are not covered by individual graduate courses or are not available in a timely manner for the student’s needs.  In order to receive a permit, the student must complete a prospectus form, approved and signed by the faculty project supervisor and the student.  The prospectus must outline the material to be covered and the basis for grading of the course, and a copy of the form will be filed with the Department Office.  POSC 495 is designed especially for reading courses but can be used for other purposes as well.  Note that this course will result in a letter grade.  Graduate students wanting to take independent study on a pass/fail basis should speak with their project supervisors about registering for POSC 601, “Individual Investigation.”

POSC 601
Individual Investigation
Staff
Times as Arranged

(Requires consent and a permit from instructor)  POSC 601 permits a graduate student to do an in-depth study of a topic of particular interest for which no regular course is available.  It should be particularly helpful in preparing for field exams.  Students must develop their course of study with a supervising professor, who will set requirements for written work.

Credit (1-6 hours) and times as arranged.  Note that this course may be taken only on a pass/fail basis.  Graduate students who wish to do a project for a letter grade should speak with their supervising professors about registering for POSC 495, “Independent Study.”

IMPORTANT:  In order to obtain a permit, the student must complete a POSC 601 project prospectus form, signed by the faculty project advisor and the student, which will form the basis of a “contract” of expectations for the project.  The prospectus form, available in the Department Office (Mather House 111), will outline the goals of the project and the research methodology to be used and thus will be part of the basis for grading.  A copy of this completed and signed form will be filed with the Department Office.

POSC 651
M.A. Thesis Research
Staff
Times as Arranged

Independent study of a research question and completion of a major paper under advisor supervision. The School of Graduate Study requires 6 credit hours be completed.  The thesis will be reviewed by the advisor and a departmental committee.

POSC 701
Dissertation Ph.D. 
Staff
Times as Arranged

(Requires consent and a permit from instructor)  Credit (1-9 hours) and times as arranged.  However, Graduate School regulations specify that a student must register for a minimum of 3 hours of 701 per semester until 18 hours of 701 credit have been completed.  After having earned 18 hours of 701, a candidate may be permitted to register for less than 3 hours per semester, but only with the prior approval of his/her dissertation advisor and only for a maximum of four semesters.  Thereafter, the student must resume registering for a minimum of 3 hours of 701 credit per semester until the dissertation is completed and defended.  See the Political Science Graduate Brochure or your POSC dissertation advisor for complete details on eligibility to register for 701.


 

Washington Center Program
Special Program

Students, regardless of their major, are encouraged to consider the Washington Center Program, which provides the opportunity to spend a semester in the nation’s capital while earning up to a full semester’s credit.

Students participate in a seminar and attend a weekly lecture/discussion group.  The emphasis, however, is on practical experience in the form of a full-time internship that provides the opportunity for intensive research in the student’s area of major interest.  Programs are available in most areas of study—from accounting to zoology.

The credits earned can be counted as general electives or applied to a student’s major or minor, with the consent of the particular department(s).  For example, in Political Science, a maximum of nine credits may be applied toward the major and six credits toward the minor.

In addition, the Washington Center offers a variety of one- and two-week academic seminars and symposia during intersession and in the summer for which credit can be earned.  Participation in these special seminars is open to all students (that is, not limited to juniors and seniors, as is the case for the regular program).

More information can be found on the Washington Center’s web site: http://www.twc.edu/.

General Requirements:  To be eligible for participation, the student must be a junior or senior and have at least a 3.0 GPA.  Seniors in the College of Arts and Sciences must have completed the general education requirements, and juniors must be near completion of these requirements.  Each application must be approved by the student’s major advisor and Case’s Washington Study liaison.  Students can attend the Washington Center Program in the summer before their junior or senior year, as well as during the regular academic year, although seniors cannot attend during their final semester.

The deadlines for application to the Washington Center are early November (Spring), early March (Summer), and early June (Fall), although some specific internship deadlines are as much as two months earlier. Students interested in the opportunity should thoroughly explore the Washington Center’s web site and then contact Professor Justin Buchler (Mather House 220; Office Phone: 368-2646; E-mail: justin.buchler@case.edu) and should do so as far in advance of application as possible.  Freshmen and sophomores are encouraged to make early inquiries in order to make sure they will be eligible by the time of their junior year and to plan their majors and other requirements properly.

 

Integrated Graduate Studies (IGS)
Special Program

It is possible for a qualified student to obtain an M.A. in Political Science simultaneously with, or shortly after, completion of the baccalaureate program.  If by the end of the senior year the student has completed successfully 90 undergraduate hours, 30 graduate hours (for a total of 120 hours), and the Political Science M.A. Examination, that student can receive both the Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees within the four undergraduate years.

Admission to the Political Science IGS program is competitive, and only a limited number of students are accepted in any academic year.  Admission is determined by fulfillment of specific requirements (see below), and by the Department’s estimate of the student’s potential for advanced study and independent work.

Phase I of IGS alerts the Department and the School of Graduate Studies to your interest in the program and allows the monitoring of your junior year for fulfillment of the undergraduate prerequisites to graduate study.  Application to Phase I must occur no later than second week of classes at the beginning of the junior year, but preferably earlier.  To qualify for Phase I, the student must have completed 54 hours of undergraduate work and must have minimum grade point averages of 3.7 in Political Science courses and 3.3 overall.

During Phase I, the student must complete 90 undergraduate hours (ordinarily by the end of the junior year) and must have satisfied all general requirements for the B.A., including at least 21 hours in the Political Science major, the Arts and Sciences Core Curriculum, and one minor program.  Included in the 21 Political Science hours must be one course each in American, Comparative, and International politics taken at CWRU.  Also, the student must maintain minimum GPAs of 3.5 in Political Science courses and 3.3 overall to qualify for admission to Phase II.

Before enrolling for any graduate-level course work, the student must be formally admitted to the School of Graduate Studies (Phase II of IGS).  Therefore, it is mandatory that application to Phase II occur during the second semester of the junior year, specifically no later than April 1 or November 1 (for graduate status to begin the following semester).  If admitted to the M.A. program, the student will take, or begin to take, 30 hours of graduate-level Political Science courses during the senior year, adhering to all departmental regulations governing the Master’s degree program; and if completed successfully with maintenance of academic standing as pertains to both the B.A. and M.A. programs, these hours will count simultaneously toward both degrees in Political Science.  The B.A. will be awarded upon completion of all requirements for that degree, including total hours; the M.A. will be awarded upon successful completion of the 30 hours of graduate-level Political Science courses and the M.A. Examination or Thesis.

For additional information on application procedures and program requirements, make an appointment to see Professor Pete Moore  (Mather House 219, 368-5265, e-mail: pete.moore@case.edu).